Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lab-made 'Microtornadoes' May Reveal Destructive Secrets Of Real-life Twisters

Date:
May 14, 2007
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
With meteorologists concerned about a possible worldwide intensification of tornado activity, scientists are proposing a new approach to studying formation of twisters, which pack Earth's most violent winds. It involves forming microtornadoes under millimeter-scale crystalline "igloos" according to a recent article.

Real-world tornadoes form in association with deep moist convection and other atmospheric conditions. As an analogue to that cloud, the image shows a nanocrystalline igloo grown from nanospheres in a water drop evaporating from a Petri dish. The circular patterns (arrow) consist of nanospheres arranged by microtornado vortexes.
Credit: Photos Courtesy of Andrei P. Sommer

With meteorologists concerned about a possible worldwide intensification of tornado activity, scientists in Germany are proposing a new approach to studying formation of twisters, which pack Earth's most violent winds. It involves forming microtornadoes under millimeter-scale crystalline "igloos," according to a report by Andrei P. Sommer scheduled for publication in the June 6 edition of ACS' Crystal Growth & Design, a bi-monthly journal.

Related Articles


In the report, Sommer describes evaporating tiny drops of water laced with polystyrene nanospheres to form the transparent igloos. The drops consisted of 15-microliters of liquid -- 15 millionths of a liter -- and formed the translucent "igloos" after being deposited on a surface under an evaporation chamber. As the drops evaporated (taking 191 hours, a record for such experiments), Sommer observed patterns formed by swirling micro-vortexes that appeared similar to those formed by tornadoes under real-world conditions.

Because the conditions favoring the formation of the microtornadoes are identical to those forming real tornadoes, Sommer suggested that such igloos and microtornadoes could become an important new tool for meteorologists seeking to understand how certain atmospheric conditions spawn tornadoes.

"By simultaneously wetting the roof of such an igloo, if necessary, and injecting minimal amounts of water containing nanospheres into it, it should be possible to mimic basic processes in tornadoes experimentally and to explore the impact of relevant boundary conditions including terrain conditions and cloud cover stability," the report states.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Lab-made 'Microtornadoes' May Reveal Destructive Secrets Of Real-life Twisters." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070514092301.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2007, May 14). Lab-made 'Microtornadoes' May Reveal Destructive Secrets Of Real-life Twisters. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070514092301.htm
American Chemical Society. "Lab-made 'Microtornadoes' May Reveal Destructive Secrets Of Real-life Twisters." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070514092301.htm (accessed April 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Saturday, April 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dispute Flares Over Controversial Thai Temple Tigers

Dispute Flares Over Controversial Thai Temple Tigers

AFP (Apr. 24, 2015) Thai wildlife officials begin a headcount of nearly 150 tigers kept by monks at a temple which has become the centre of a dispute over the welfare of the animals. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Volcano Under Yellowstone Is Way Bigger Than We Thought

The Volcano Under Yellowstone Is Way Bigger Than We Thought

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2015) Researchers have discovered a second and larger magma reservoir under Yellowstone National Park, but say the risk of a large eruption is the same. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chile Volcano Cloud Spreads

Chile Volcano Cloud Spreads

Reuters - News Video Online (Apr. 24, 2015) Southern Argentina struggles to cope with a blanket of ash after the eruption of the Calbuco volcano in Chile. Rough cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Evacuate As Chile Volcano Erupts Twice In 24 Hours

Thousands Evacuate As Chile Volcano Erupts Twice In 24 Hours

Newsy (Apr. 23, 2015) Chile&apos;s Calbuco volcano erupted twice in a span of 24 hours, once Wednesday evening and again early Thursday morning. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins