Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Black Patients With Asthma May Fare Worse Regardless Of Disease Severity

Date:
September 26, 2007
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Patients with asthma who are black appear more likely to visit the emergency department or be hospitalized for the condition than those who are white, even in a managed care setting that provides uniform access to care.

Patients with asthma who are black appear more likely to visit the emergency department or be hospitalized for the condition than those who are white, even in a managed care setting that provides uniform access to care, according to a report in the Sept. 24 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Research has shown that black patients with asthma have worse control of their symptoms and higher rates of hospitalization and death than white patients, according to background information in the article.

Reasons may include inadequate access to health care, lower socioeconomic status, genetic or behavioral factors, suboptimal use of asthma control medications, environmental exposures and poor communication or racial bias among health care providers. Previous studies have adjusted for the effects of socioeconomic status and found that racial disparities in asthma outcomes persisted.

Sara E. Erickson, M.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues studied 678 patients in one large health plan who were hospitalized for asthma between 2000 and 2004. The patients were interviewed after they were discharged to gather information about their disease and how it affected their lives, their health status and their socioeconomic status. U.S. Census data also was used to gather socioeconomic data from within one block of their home. The patients were followed up for a median (midpoint) of 1.9 years to see if they visited the emergency department or were readmitted to the hospital.

Of the patients included in the study, 524 were white and 154 were black. Although there was no difference between black and white patients in asthma severity, physical health status or controller medication use, blacks were significantly more likely than whites to have had outpatient visits related to their asthma during the study follow-up. Also during this time period, 35.7 percent of black patients compared with 21 percent of white patients visited the emergency department for asthma symptoms and 26.6 percent of blacks vs. 15.3 percent of whites were hospitalized for asthma. These associations remained when the researchers controlled for socioeconomic status and differences in asthma therapy.

"The reasons underlying the racial disparities observed in this study are not clear, although they are likely to be complex," the authors write. Because knowledge of racial disparities is widespread, clinicians may be more likely to encourage black patients to seek emergency care for their asthma and emergency room physicians maybe more likely to admit blacks, they note. Alternatively, there may be differences in behavior or cultural beliefs about asthma, or in therapies not measured in this study.

"Even in a health care setting that provides uniform access to care, black race was associated with worse asthma outcomes, including a greater risk of emergency department visits and hospitalizations," the authors conclude. "These findings suggest that genetic differences may underlie these racial disparities."

Article: Arch Intern Med. 2007;167(17):1846-1852.

This study was supported by a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Black Patients With Asthma May Fare Worse Regardless Of Disease Severity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070924163024.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2007, September 26). Black Patients With Asthma May Fare Worse Regardless Of Disease Severity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070924163024.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Black Patients With Asthma May Fare Worse Regardless Of Disease Severity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070924163024.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Aimed at reducing sexual assaults on college campuses, California has adopted a new law changing the standard of consent for sexual activity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Researchers looked at 1,500 blood samples and determined people who developed pancreatic cancer had more branched chain amino acids. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins