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Creatine In Addition To Exercise Enhances Strength In Older Adults

Date:
October 4, 2007
Source:
McMaster University
Summary:
While exercise is a proven way to prevent the loss of muscle mass, a new study shows that taking a combination of creatine monohydrate and conjugated linoleic acid in addition to resistance exercise training provides even greater benefits.
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Lower muscle mass and an increase in body fat are common consequences of growing older.

While exercise is a proven way to prevent the loss of muscle mass, a new study led by McMaster researcher Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky shows that taking a combination of creatine monohydrate (CrM) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in addition to resistance exercise training provides even greater benefits.

The study to be published on Oct. 3 in PLoS One, involved 19 men and 20 women who were 65 years or older and took part in a six-month program of regular resistance exercise training.

In the randomized double blind trial, some of the participants were given a daily supplement of creatine (a naturally produced compound that supplies energy to muscles) and linoleic acid (a naturally occurring fatty acid), while others were given a placebo. All participants took part in the same exercise program.

The exercise training resulted in improvements of functional ability and strength in all participants, but those taking the CrM and CLA showed even greater gains in muscle endurance, an increase in fat-free mass and a decrease in the percentage of body fat.

"This data confirms that supervised resistance exercise training is safe and effective for increasing strength and function in older adults and that a combination of CrM and CLA can enhance some of the beneficial effects of training over a six month period," said Tarnopolsky, a professor of pediatrics and medicine.

This study provides functional outcomes that build on an earlier mechanistic study co-led by Tarnopolsky and Dr. S. Melov at the Buck Institute of Age Research, published in PLoS One this year, which provided evidence that six months of resistance exercise reversed some of the muscle gene expression abnormalities associated with the aging process.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by McMaster University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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McMaster University. "Creatine In Addition To Exercise Enhances Strength In Older Adults." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071002213425.htm>.
McMaster University. (2007, October 4). Creatine In Addition To Exercise Enhances Strength In Older Adults. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071002213425.htm
McMaster University. "Creatine In Addition To Exercise Enhances Strength In Older Adults." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071002213425.htm (accessed August 27, 2015).

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