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Inconsistencies With Neanderthal Genomic DNA Sequences

Date:
October 14, 2007
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
The sequencing of Neanderthal nuclear DNA from fossil bone held promise for finally answering the question of whether the Neanderthals are ancestors of ours. However, two recent studies came to very different conclusions regarding the ancestral role of Neanderthals.

Were Neanderthals direct ancestors of contemporary humans or an evolutionary side branch that eventually died out?

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This is one of the enduring questions in human evolution as scientists explore the relationship of fossil groups, such as Neanderthals, with people alive today. Two recent papers describing the sequencing of Neanderthal nuclear DNA from fossil bone held promise for finally answering this question [1, 2].

However, the two studies came to very different conclusions regarding the ancestral role of Neanderthals. Jeffrey D. Wall and Sung K. Kim from University of California San Francisco now reveal in PLoS Genetics what they found when they reanalyzed the data from the two original studies.

Wall and Kim's reanalysis reveals inconsistencies between them and they believe that possible contamination with modern human DNA and/or a high rate of sequencing errors compromised the findings of one of the original Neanderthal DNA studies.

The authors therefore recommend that we carefully evaluate published and future data before arriving at any firm conclusions about human evolution.

References

1. Noonan JP, Coop G, Kudaravalli S, Smith D, Krause J, et al. (2006) Sequencing and analysis of Neanderthal genomic DNA. Science 314: 1113-1118.

2. Green RE, Krause J, Ptak SE, Briggs AW, Ronan MT, et al. (2006) Analysis of one million base pairs of Neanderthal DNA. Nature 16: 330-336.

Citation: Wall JD, Kim SK (2007) Inconsistencies in Neanderthal genomic DNA sequences. PLoS Genet 3(10): e175. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.0030175


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The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Inconsistencies With Neanderthal Genomic DNA Sequences." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071012160147.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2007, October 14). Inconsistencies With Neanderthal Genomic DNA Sequences. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071012160147.htm
Public Library of Science. "Inconsistencies With Neanderthal Genomic DNA Sequences." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071012160147.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

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