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Diet Linked To Cognitive Decline And Dementia

Date:
November 12, 2007
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
Research has shown convincing evidence that dietary patterns practiced during adulthood are important contributors to age-related cognitive decline and dementia risk.

An article published in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences highlights information on the benefits of diets high in fruit, vegetables, cereals and fish and low in saturated fats in reducing dementia risk.
Credit: iStockphoto/Gabor Izso

Research has shown convincing evidence that dietary patterns practiced during adulthood are important contributors to age-related cognitive decline and dementia risk. An article published in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences highlights information on the benefits of diets high in fruit, vegetables, cereals and fish and low in saturated fats in reducing dementia risk.

Adults with diabetes are especially sensitive to the foods they eat with respect to cognitive function. Specifically, an adult with diabetes will experience a decline in memory function after a meal, especially if simple carbohydrate foods are consumed. While the precise physiological mechanisms underlying these dietary influences are not completely understood, the modulation of brain insulin levels likely contributes.

This deficit can be prevented through healthful food choices at meals. The findings suggest that weight maintenance reduces the risk of developing obesity-associated disorders, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, and is an important component of preserving cognitive health.

The work shows another benefit of maintaining healthful eating practices with aging – the same ones proposed by most diabetes and heart & stroke foundations. “This type of information should be able to empower the individual, knowing that he/she can be actively engaged in activities and lifestyles that should support cognitive health with aging,” says Carol Greenwood, author of the study.

This study, entitled “Dietary Influences on Cognitive Function with Aging,” is published in volume 1114 of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences: Healthy Aging and Longevity.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Diet Linked To Cognitive Decline And Dementia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071106164725.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2007, November 12). Diet Linked To Cognitive Decline And Dementia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071106164725.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Diet Linked To Cognitive Decline And Dementia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071106164725.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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