Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Understanding Allergies By Mapping Chemical Structures Recognized By Immune System

Date:
November 16, 2007
Source:
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology
Summary:
New research could lead to revolutionary new approaches for treating allergies based on targeting T cells, white blood cells that regulate the immune response. The project will map down to the level of molecules and atoms the chemical structures recognized by the immune system and which cause it to initiate an allergic reaction.

A major study that will provide a new window into understanding and potentially treating allergies will be conducted by the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology (LIAI) under a $5 million federal contract. The five-year study, funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, could lead to revolutionary new approaches for treating allergies based on targeting T cells, white blood cells that regulate the immune response and which are some of the principal warriors in the body's defense.

LIAI, a nonprofit organization and one of the world's leading immunology research centers, will partner on the study with clinical researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego) and the National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, Colorado. Both centers will set up human subject protocols involving allergy sufferers who will donate blood for the LIAI study.

The study will involve 200 donors over five years and will look at 32 common allergen sources, such as trees, grasses, weeds, fungi, mites, insects and mammals. Food allergies are not part of the study.

Howard Grey, M.D., project co-investigator, said the study will push knowledge of allergies to a deeper level. "The whole field has been dominated by the analysis of the antibody response, because that's what causes many of the symptoms of the disease -- the sneezing, sniffling, coughing and so forth," he said, noting that the discovery of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody in 1966 by Kimishige Ishizaka, M.D., Ph.D. and his wife, Teruko Ishizaka, Ph.D., who later helped launch LIAI, revolutionized allergy research.

"Now the scientific community has the tools to take our knowledge even further by analyzing T cell responses," he said. "It seems in keeping with our history that LIAI will now lead the next step -- breaking down the allergy response to its most basic molecular level."

Results from the project will be available to scientists worldwide via the NIAID's Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), the world's largest research database on how the immune system responds to infectious diseases, allergens and other agents. The database, developed by LIAI under an NIAID contract, is a public health tool designed to speed the development of vaccines and treatments by sharing important research data with scientists around the globe.

Mitchell Kronenberg, Ph.D., LIAI president & scientific director, said the project is a perfect fit with LIAI because it is developing the IEDB. In addition, allergies are a cornerstone of its immunology-focused research activities. "Many people may not be aware that the immune system plays a role in so many diseases -- from cancer to infectious diseases," he said. "Allergies are no exception, and result from inappropriate or overactive immune responses." Kronenberg said the study also enables further collaboration between LIAI, now located in the new Science Research Park at UC San Diego, and the University's researchers.

Sette said the project will map down to the level of molecules and atoms the chemical structures recognized by the immune system and which cause it to initiate an allergic reaction. "This has the potential to directly impact all people who are afflicted with allergies, because it may lead to new, more effective ways of diagnosing and treating these diseases." According to the NIAID, allergic diseases affect as many as 40 to 50 million Americans, and they are among the major causes of illness and disability in the United States. Allergies can also lead to asthma, a respiratory disorder that accounts for one-quarter of all emergency room visits in the U.S. each year.

LIAI researchers will identify the specific allergy epitopes that cause T cells to launch an attack against the allergens. Epitopes are tiny sites on a protein or other molecule that instigate a T cell response. "This opens the possibility of developing therapies around those epitopes," Grey said. "There have already been some clinical trials which are showing promise with the approach of treating patients with allergy-related epitopes. The information we're developing will provide the clinical community with the ability to try this approach with a wide variety of allergic diseases."

Currently, many allergy sufferers receive desensitization treatments, whereby the patient is given increasing doses of the substance causing allergy or allergen over a long period of time in order to develop immune tolerance to the allergen. The approach can be problematic because patients already have antibodies to the allergens, which can cause reactions, and because it is also a very lengthy process.

The idea behind the epitope-based therapies is that patients could be given small pieces or epitopes from the allergen that would be able to induce immune tolerance, without instigating an antibody reaction, Sette explained. If this proves true, it could produce the same effects as the current desensitization therapies, but in a much shorter period of time, and without the allergic side effects. "You would be desensitizing the cells (with the allergy epitopes), rather than activating them," he added.

Another important aspect of the research is analyzing the effects of regulatory T cells in the allergy process. This T cell type, which has only been discovered in the last decade, appears to suppress T cell reactions to allergens, rather than cause them. "We are hoping to find specific epitopes that activate these regulatory T cells," said John Sidney, project co-investigator. "If so, we might have an extremely powerful tool for treating allergy diseases."

LIAI's project efforts will be accelerated through bioinformatics along with the use of the allergy epitope information already in the IEDB. Bioinformatics uses computer databases, algorithms and statistical techniques to analyze biological information. "We developed the IEDB and we're going to take advantage of that huge resource to improve our epitope identification algorithms based on that data," said Bjoern Peters, Ph.D., project co-investigator. "We'll use those algorithms to statistically determine which allergy epitopes are most likely to trigger a T cell response and then test those assumptions in the lab. By using bioinformatics, we will greatly speed the development of the project data."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology. "Understanding Allergies By Mapping Chemical Structures Recognized By Immune System." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071113074937.htm>.
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology. (2007, November 16). Understanding Allergies By Mapping Chemical Structures Recognized By Immune System. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071113074937.htm
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology. "Understanding Allergies By Mapping Chemical Structures Recognized By Immune System." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071113074937.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

AP (July 30, 2014) At least 20 New Jersey residents have tested positive for chikungunya, a mosquito-borne virus that has spread through the Caribbean. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Center for Science in the Public Interest released its 2014 list of single meals with whopping calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins