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Sensing Bacteria In The Gut Keeps Inflammation At Bay

Date:
November 18, 2007
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
New data generated in mice has provided support for the hypothesis that defects in the innate immune system might underlie some cases of inflammatory bowel disease -- a group of disorders characterized by inflammation in the intestine. In the study, mice lacking a protein known as TLR5 (which senses the bacterial protein flagellin and initiates a proinflammatory response) were found to spontaneously develop inflammation of the colon (colitis), whereas normal mice did not spontaneously develop this disease.
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New data generated in mice by Andrew Gewirtz and colleagues at Emory University, Atlanta, has provided support for the hypothesis that defects in the innate immune system might underlie some cases of inflammatory bowel disease -- a group of disorders characterized by inflammation in the intestine.

In the study, mice lacking a protein known as TLR5 (which senses the bacterial protein flagellin and initiates a proinflammatory response) were found to spontaneously develop inflammation of the colon (colitis), whereas normal mice did not spontaneously develop this disease.

Just prior to the onset of spontaneous colitis increased numbers of bacteria were detected in the colon, as were very high levels of proinflammatory mediators. The latter observation was surprising given that TLR5-deficient mice lack an immune sensor of bacterial flagellin.

However, consistent with the authors idea that this increased proinflammatory response was induced by other sensors of bacterial products, mice lacking TLR4 and TLR5 did not develop colitis. These data indicate that a deficiency in an immune sensor of bacteria can lead to an increased inflammatory response in the intestine of mice.

Article: Deletion of TLR5 results in spontaneous colitis in mice, Journal of Clinical Investigation


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Sensing Bacteria In The Gut Keeps Inflammation At Bay." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071115184805.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2007, November 18). Sensing Bacteria In The Gut Keeps Inflammation At Bay. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071115184805.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Sensing Bacteria In The Gut Keeps Inflammation At Bay." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071115184805.htm (accessed August 1, 2015).

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