Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mice Lacking Enzyme Renin Stay Lean On High-fat Diet, With Little Exercise

Date:
December 6, 2007
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
A new study elucidates the connection between an enzyme involved in blood pressure control and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. The researchers report that mice lacking the enzyme known as renin are lean and resistant to gaining weight on a high-fat diet, even though they continue to eat just as much and don't exercise more.

New research shows that mice lacking the enzyme known as renin are lean and resistant to gaining weight on a high-fat diet, even though they continue to eat just as much and don't exercise more.
Credit: iStockphoto/Emilia Stasiak

A new study elucidates the connection between an enzyme involved in blood pressure control and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. The researchers report in the December issue of Cell Metabolism, a publication of Cell Press, that mice lacking the enzyme known as renin are lean and resistant to gaining weight on a high-fat diet, even though they continue to eat just as much and don't exercise more.

The findings suggest that renin-blocking drugs designed for treating high blood pressure might also improve obesity and insulin resistance, according to the researchers. Renin plays an important rate-limiting role in the production of a hormone called angiotensin II (Ang II) that increases blood pressure by constricting blood vessels.

"An overactive renin-angiotensin system has also been associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome," said Nobuyuki Takahashi of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "Now we've gained new insight into the mechanism responsible."

The metabolic syndrome is characterized by central obesity, hypertension, abnormally high blood lipid levels, and impaired glucose tolerance, the researchers explained. It also increases the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. While most theories to explain the condition have focused on primary defects of insulin action, the renin-angiotensin system has also been implicated.

Clinical trials have shown that drugs that block other parts of the renin-angiotensin system improve insulin sensitivity and decrease the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Studies have also revealed that mice lacking angiotensinogen, the substrate that renin acts on, are lean and resistant to diet-induced obesity.

In the current study, the researchers generated mice with a predisposition for obesity that were also deficient for renin. They found that the renin-less mice were lean, resistant to diet-induced obesity, and more insulin sensitive than normal mice.

"This metabolically favorable state results partly from an increased metabolic rate and partly from gastrointestinal loss of dietary fat, but not from increased physical activity or decreased food intake," they said. The metabolic effects were explained almost entirely by a lack of Ang II in the absence of renin. Renin's other effects on metabolism were minimal.

"Our findings are particularly relevant since they suggest that renin inhibitors recently approved or under development for the treatment of hypertension are likely to have favorable effects on obesity, insulin sensitivity, and their associated metabolic and cardiovascular consequences," the researchers said.

The researchers include Nobuyuki Takahashi, Feng Li, Kunjie Hua, Jianbei Deng, Chih-Hong Wang, Hyung-Suk Kim, and Joyce B. Harp, of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Robert R. Bowers, and Timothy J. Bartness, of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cell Press. "Mice Lacking Enzyme Renin Stay Lean On High-fat Diet, With Little Exercise." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 December 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071204122015.htm>.
Cell Press. (2007, December 6). Mice Lacking Enzyme Renin Stay Lean On High-fat Diet, With Little Exercise. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071204122015.htm
Cell Press. "Mice Lacking Enzyme Renin Stay Lean On High-fat Diet, With Little Exercise." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071204122015.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

AP (July 30, 2014) At least 20 New Jersey residents have tested positive for chikungunya, a mosquito-borne virus that has spread through the Caribbean. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Center for Science in the Public Interest released its 2014 list of single meals with whopping calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins