Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Discovery Opens New Window To Understanding Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Date:
December 11, 2007
Source:
Oregon Health & Science University
Summary:
Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute researchers have opened a new window into the roots of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). "We are looking under the surface of CML to understand better where the cancer is coming from. We have discovered abnormal cells in the early stem cell population in some CML patients, which don't belong to the CML clone. These are abnormal cells that are not part of the CML clone," said Thomas Bumm, M.D., OHSU Cancer Institute member.

Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute researchers have opened a new window into the roots of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).

Related Articles


"We are looking under the surface of CML to understand better where the cancer is coming from. We have discovered abnormal cells in the early stem cell population in some CML patients, which don't belong to the CML clone. These are abnormal cells that are not part of the CML clone," said Thomas Bumm, M.D., OHSU Cancer Institute member.

This research will be presented at the American Society of Hematology annual meeting in Atlanta on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 4:30 p.m.

Bumm was looking into Philadelphia Chromosome-negative stem cells -- which he and others had thought would look like normal, healthy cells, and have normal chromosomes. (It has been known that the driving force of CML is the Philadelphia Chromosome-positive cancer cells.)

"But no, these chromosome negative cells are not normal looking. We are seeing that there are other abnormal cells in the early stem cell population in the bone marrow of some CML patients that are Philadelphia Chromosome-negative. They have abnormalities such as the deletion of chromosome 7 or a duplication of chromosome 8," explained Bumm, a fellow in hematology/medical oncology, OHSU School of Medicine.

It is not known why patients with CML have these abnormal cells and to what extent. These newly discovered abnormal cells are also seen in other cancers such as myelodysplastic syndrome.

"We are not yet sure about the extent of this problem. We do hope though that our studies into the stem cell compartment of CML patients might help to find new targets for CML therapy to cure this cancer," Bumm said.

Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a form of blood cancer characterized by the increased and unregulated growth of predominantly myeloid cells in the bone marrow and the accumulation of these cells in the blood.

The next step, although costly, will be to analyze more leukemia patients as well as healthy bone marrow samples to continue to look for these new abnormalities.

Working with Bumm on this research is Amy E. Hanlon Newell, Ph.D., senior research associate in molecular and medical genetics, OHSU School of Medicine; and Jutta Deininger M.D., senior research assistant, hematology/medical oncology, OHSU School of Medicine and an OHSU Cancer Institute member.

The study was performed in the laboratory of Michael Deininger, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of medicine, hematology/medical oncology, OHSU School of Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Oregon Health & Science University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Oregon Health & Science University. "Discovery Opens New Window To Understanding Chronic Myeloid Leukemia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 December 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071210094346.htm>.
Oregon Health & Science University. (2007, December 11). Discovery Opens New Window To Understanding Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071210094346.htm
Oregon Health & Science University. "Discovery Opens New Window To Understanding Chronic Myeloid Leukemia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071210094346.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins