Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

What Tips The Balance? Understanding Why X Chromosome Inactivation Can Be Skewed

Date:
December 26, 2007
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
To ensure that women and men express equivalent levels of the genes found on X chromosomes, one of the two X chromosomes in the cells of a women is inactive. X chromosome inactivation (XCI) occurs early in development, at approximately the time an embryo implants in the womb, and all cells stemming from a given cell have the same X chromosome inactivated.

To ensure that women and men express equivalent levels of the genes found on X chromosomes, one of the two X chromosomes in the cells of a women is inactive. X chromosome inactivation (XCI) occurs early in development, at approximately the time an embryo implants in the womb, and all cells stemming from a given cell have the same X chromosome inactivated.

Which X chromosome is inactivated is random and most females have approximately equal numbers of cells with each X chromosome inactivated. However, some individuals have a much greater proportion of their cells with a given X chromosome inactivated.

Such skewing of XCI can have clinical implications, for example, increased XCI skewing has been linked to premature ovarian failure and recurrent spontaneous abortion. To use XCI skewing effectively as a clinical tool more information is needed about the underlying mechanisms.

In a new study, Lambert Busque and colleagues at the University of Montreal, have shown that XCI skewing is a complex trait determined by secondary events and selection biases rather than being the result of an inherited tendency to inactivate a particular X chromosome.

Carolyn Brown and colleagues from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, highlight the importance of these observations in an accompanying commentary.

Article: No evidence that skewing of X chromosome inactivation patterns is transmitted to offspring in humans. Journal of Clinical Investigation. December 20, 2007.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "What Tips The Balance? Understanding Why X Chromosome Inactivation Can Be Skewed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 December 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071220172123.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2007, December 26). What Tips The Balance? Understanding Why X Chromosome Inactivation Can Be Skewed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071220172123.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "What Tips The Balance? Understanding Why X Chromosome Inactivation Can Be Skewed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071220172123.htm (accessed April 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 22, 2014) Big pharma on the move as Novartis boss, Joe Jimenez, tells Reuters about plans to transform his company via an asset exchange with GSK, and Astra Zeneca shares surge on speculation that Pfizer is looking for a takeover. Joanna Partridge reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

AP (Apr. 22, 2014) Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is given hands-on demonstrations Tuesday of some of the newest research from DARPA _ the military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program. (April 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins