Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Selective Restraints And Reduced Medication Could Reduce Nursing Home Falls Says 4-year Study

Date:
January 14, 2008
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
Analysis of more than 2,300 falls and fractures at 21 Swedish nursing homes quantifies increased fall risks from certain drugs and protective effects of selective restraints. However, the authors point out that in using restraints healthcare professionals should take into account the need to maintain the patients' independence if possible and the fact that restraints can themselves cause injuries.

Selectively restraining elderly residents and giving them fewer sleeping pills could significantly reduce falls, according to a survey of 21 nursing home units published in the January issue of Journal of Clinical Nursing.

The four-year study, led by the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, analysed 2,343 reported falls and fractures in five municipal homes to find out how they related to fall risk assessments and the use of safety belts, wheelchairs and sleeping pills.

Researchers analysed incidents affecting 743 males and 1,908 females ranging from 40 to 105 years of age, with an average age of 72. All had been diagnosed with a physical illness or dementia and some suffered from both.

The researchers found that people using certain drugs were much more likely to experience a fall. Sleeping pills and anti-depressants made people 1.4 times more likely to fall, neuroleptics (antipsychotic drugs) made them 1.9 times more likely and sleeping pills with benzodiazepines (sedatives) made them 2.9 times more likely.

"In Sweden the use of medication has increased during the past ten years" explains lead author Edit Fonad RN MNSc from the Department of Neurobiology at the Institutet.

"Nine per cent of the population are aged 75 years or more, yet this group accounts for a quarter of the medication prescribed in the country. On average, this age group consumes six to 10 different types of medication."

People who were in wheelchairs, or who had been assessed as a fall risk, were much less likely to fall. The fall risk was assessed as 0.7, with 1.0 being the normal average. Bed rails reduced this risk even further to 0.5 and the risk when belts were used was negligible at 0.09.

"Patients are often restrained for reasons that remain unclear and more often as a matter of routine rather than a reaction to a specific situation" says Edit Fonad. "These actions are often justified by concerns for patient safety or behaviour control."

However, the authors point out that in using restraints healthcare professionals should take into account the need to maintain the patients' independence if possible and the fact that restraints can themselves cause injuries.

"It is impossible to prevent every single fall and we cannot rule out the fact that freedom-restricting measures will continue to be used in the care of older people" concludes Edit Fonad.

"Our results suggests that freedom-restricting actions cannot eliminate falls totally, but they might be protective when used selectively with fewer sedatives, especially benzodiazepines."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Selective Restraints And Reduced Medication Could Reduce Nursing Home Falls Says 4-year Study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080114090718.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2008, January 14). Selective Restraints And Reduced Medication Could Reduce Nursing Home Falls Says 4-year Study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080114090718.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Selective Restraints And Reduced Medication Could Reduce Nursing Home Falls Says 4-year Study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080114090718.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

Reuters - US Online Video (July 31, 2014) The Republican-led House of Representatives votes to sue President Obama, accusing him of overstepping his executive authority in making changes to the Affordable Care Act. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Newsy (July 31, 2014) Citing 81 previous studies, new research out of London suggests the benefits of smoking e-cigarettes instead of regular ones outweighs the risks. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins