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New Bone Created In Minimally Invasive Procedure

Date:
February 19, 2008
Source:
Yale University
Summary:
A new technique that combines bone marrow removal and injection of a hormone helps promote rapid formation of new bone at targeted locations in the body. The procedure creates new bone tissue that appears structurally and biologically normal and that endows the targeted bone with improved biomechanical properties at a rate and extent that would not be achievable by anabolic therapy alone.

The bone bioreactor: replacement of bone marrow by bone.
Credit: Image courtesy of Yale University

A new technique that combines bone marrow removal and injection of a hormone helps promote rapid formation of new bone at targeted locations in the body, it was reported by Yale School of Medicine recently in Tissue Engineering.

"This could radically change the way patients are currently treated for weakened or fractured hips, vertebrae and acute traumatic long bone fractures," said senior author Agnθs Vignery, associate professor of orthopedics.

She said currently available treatment requires surgery and artificial materials and often results in imperfect outcomes. "The ideal approach would be to create new bone where it is needed and at a faster rate," Vignery said.

The study in mice was done in collaboration with Unigene Laboratories, Inc. It evaluated the effect of bone marrow removal from particular sites followed by daily injections of anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone (PTH).

The procedure creates new bone tissue that appears structurally and biologically normal and that endows the targeted bone with improved biomechanical properties at a rate and extent that would not be achievable by anabolic therapy alone, Vignery said.

"We have shown that it is the synergistic effect of mechanical marrow ablation and PTH that allows for this new bone to fill the marrow cavity," she said.

She said additional studies are underway that extend the results of this work in other animals and that will determine whether the newly formed bone can be preserved over a long period of time.

Reference: Tissue Engineering February 2008. Co-authors include Qing Zhang, Estaban Cuartas, W. Mark Saltzman, Maya Kotas, Mandy Ma, Sonali Rajan, Cιcile Chalouni, and Jodi Carlson, of Yale, as well as Nozer Mehta, James Gilligan, and Hua-Zhu Ke.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Yale University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Yale University. "New Bone Created In Minimally Invasive Procedure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080214153529.htm>.
Yale University. (2008, February 19). New Bone Created In Minimally Invasive Procedure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080214153529.htm
Yale University. "New Bone Created In Minimally Invasive Procedure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080214153529.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

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