Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Physical Activity Delays Onset Of Huntington's In Mouse Model

Date:
April 2, 2008
Source:
BioMed Central/BMC Neuroscience
Summary:
The simple act of running in an exercise wheel delays the onset of some symptoms of Huntington's disease in a mouse model of the fatal human disorder according to new research. These findings add insights into the pathogenesis of the disease and suggest possible preventive therapeutic targets.

The simple act of running in an exercise wheel delays the onset of some symptoms of Huntington's disease in a mouse model of the fatal human disorder according to new research. These findings add insights into the pathogenesis of the disease and suggest possible preventive therapeutic targets.

Huntington's disease affects up to one person in every 10 000, but clusters in families and certain populations. Affected people develop clusters of a defective protein in their neurons and shrinkage of brain areas associated with movement. The disorder causes disability and eventually death, but does not normally manifest until after people have had children, allowing the disease gene to be passed on.

"Although Huntington's disease is considered the epitome of genetic determinism, environmental factors are increasingly recognised to influence the disease progress", the researchers write.

The research team from the University of Oxford and the Howard Florey Institute, University of Melbourne, report findings of a study in mice with the genetic mutation that causes Huntington's in humans. Just as mentally stimulating these mice by enriching their environment had previously been shown to delay onset and progression of motor symptoms, so does the simple physical activity of running in a wheel.

"Of particular interest was the fact that the wheel exercise was started in juvenile mice, much earlier than in a previous study that showed more limited protective effects of physical activity," explains Anthony Hannan of the Howard Florey Institute. This finding suggests that the protective effect has a specific time window.

Hannan notes "Physical activity did not postpone all the motor symptoms delayed by environmental enrichment, which suggests that sensory stimulation, mental exercise, and physical activity could all be used for the benefit of human sufferers". Early intervention is also possible in people who will develop Huntington's, because genetic diagnosis is possible.

Density of protein aggregates in neurons and shrinkage in brain regions in mice that had benefited from physical activity were as advanced as in those raised without wheels, the authors suggest therefore that benefits stem from stimulation of neuronal receptors and other molecules that prolongs normal function and delays motor deficits.

Journal reference: Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease. Anton van Dellen, Patricia M Cordery, Tara L Spires, Colin Blakemore and Anthony J Hannan. BMC Neuroscience (in press)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central/BMC Neuroscience. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

BioMed Central/BMC Neuroscience. "Physical Activity Delays Onset Of Huntington's In Mouse Model." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331223821.htm>.
BioMed Central/BMC Neuroscience. (2008, April 2). Physical Activity Delays Onset Of Huntington's In Mouse Model. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331223821.htm
BioMed Central/BMC Neuroscience. "Physical Activity Delays Onset Of Huntington's In Mouse Model." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331223821.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Newsy (July 18, 2014) Yale researchers tested 135 men and women, and it was only obese women who were deemed to have "impaired associative learning." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins