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Fossil From Last Common Ancestor Of Neanderthals And Humans Found In Europe, 1.2 Million Years Old

Date:
April 4, 2008
Source:
University of Michigan
Summary:
Archaeologists have discovered the oldest known remains of human ancestors in Western Europe. The fossil is about 1.2 million years old. That's 500,000 years older than the previous oldest known humanlike fossils from the area. The new find bolsters the view that Homo reached Europe not long after leaving Africa almost 2 million years ago.

Top view of the mandible ATE 9-1.
Credit: EIA/Jordi Mestre

University of Michigan researcher Josep M. Pares is part of a team that has discovered the oldest known remains of human ancestors in Western Europe.

The find shows that members of the genus Homo, to which modern humans belong, colonized the region much earlier than previously believed. Details of the discovery were published in the March 27 issue of the journal Nature.

The fossil—a small piece of jawbone with a few teeth—was found last year in a cave in the mountains of northern Spain, along with primitive stone tools and bones of animals that appear to have been butchered.

The team, led by Spanish researchers Juan Luis Arsuaga, José María Bermúdez de Castro and Eudald Carbonell, used three separate techniques (including paleomagnetic analyses performed by Pares) to determine that the fossil is about 1.2 million years old. That's 500,000 years older than the previous oldest known humanlike fossils from the area. The new find bolsters the view that Homo reached Europe not long after leaving Africa almost 2 million years ago.

"It seems probable that the first European population came from the region of the Near East, the true crossroads between Africa and Eurasia, and that it was related to the first demographic expansion out of Africa," said Pares, who is a research scientist in the U-M Department of Geological Sciences and program director of the newly created National Research Center on Human Evolution (CENIEH) in Burgos, Spain, with which most of the authors are affiliated.

The researchers tentatively classified the new fossil as an earlier example Homo antecessor (Pioneer Man), the species represented by the previous oldest fossils and thought to be the last common ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans.

"This is a very significant advance toward a better understanding of the nature, age and protagonists of the first European human settlement," Pares said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Michigan. "Fossil From Last Common Ancestor Of Neanderthals And Humans Found In Europe, 1.2 Million Years Old." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080403185958.htm>.
University of Michigan. (2008, April 4). Fossil From Last Common Ancestor Of Neanderthals And Humans Found In Europe, 1.2 Million Years Old. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080403185958.htm
University of Michigan. "Fossil From Last Common Ancestor Of Neanderthals And Humans Found In Europe, 1.2 Million Years Old." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080403185958.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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