Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Colon Adenoma Prevention With Certain Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Is Effective For Patients Without Underlying Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Study Suggests

Date:
April 14, 2008
Source:
American Association for Cancer Research
Summary:
Colon adenoma prevention with celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is effective and can be safe for patients without underlying cardiovascular risk factors, according to five-year data of a randomized phase III trial. "There has been a significant amount of negative press about Cox-2 inhibitors including celecoxib, and clearly these drugs are risky for some patients. However, our study also shows that for patients without major cardiovascular risk factors, celecoxib at low doses protects against high-risk lesions that can lead to colon cancer," said an associate professor of surgery at the Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Colon adenoma prevention with celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is effective and can be safe for patients without underlying cardiovascular risk factors, according to five-year data of a randomized phase III trial.

"There has been a significant amount of negative press about Cox-2 inhibitors including celecoxib, and clearly these drugs are risky for some patients. However, our study also shows that for patients without major cardiovascular risk factors, celecoxib at low doses protects against high-risk lesions that can lead to colon cancer," said Monica Bertagnolli, M.D., associate professor of surgery at the Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Bertagnolli was the lead researcher on the Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) trial, which enrolled 2,035 patients and randomly assigned them to 200 mg twice-daily (400 mg) of celecoxib, 400 mg twice-daily (800 mg) of celecoxib or a placebo group.

At three years, patients taking celecoxib at 400 mg had a 29 percent reduction in adenomas, a precursor to colon cancer, while those taking 800 mg had a 38 percent reduction. Advanced adenomas, which are lesions with a high-risk for cancer development, were reduced by 55 percent with 400 mg and 63 percent with 800 mg.

After three years, patients stopped taking celecoxib and were followed for another two years to assess safety and effectiveness. Even after two years off medication, the five-year rate of advanced adenoma was reduced by 41 percent among patients taking the lower dose and 26 percent among patients taking the higher dose.

Cardiovascular events were more common in patients taking celecoxib, with a rate of 3.8 percent among those patients taking placebo to 6 percent among the low dose group and 7.5 percent among the high dose group. However, when researchers looked at factors that might predict cardiovascular complications, they found a much different story.

For patients with no cardiovascular risk factors before using celecoxib, the rate of cardiovascular adverse events was 0.9 percent in the placebo group, 3.9 percent in the 400 mg group and 1.9 percent in the high dose group. Cardiovascular risk factors included smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, presence of atherosclerosis and age over 65.

If a patient had one risk factor, the risk was 2.2 percent in the placebo group, 3.7 percent in the 400 mg dose group and 4.9 percent in the high dose group.

The greater cardiovascular risk was observed among patients who had at least two cardiovascular risk factors at the time they entered the study, where the placebo group had a 5.9 percent risk, the 400 mg group had an 8.2 percent risk and the 800 mg group had an 11.2 percent risk.

"This new data allows us to carefully select patients who can benefit from this drug," Bertagnolli said. "Although it should be used with caution, those patients with a high risk for colon cancer and a low risk for cardiovascular disease are going to receive significant benefit."

This research was presented at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, April 12-16, 2008.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Association for Cancer Research. "Colon Adenoma Prevention With Certain Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Is Effective For Patients Without Underlying Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080414170953.htm>.
American Association for Cancer Research. (2008, April 14). Colon Adenoma Prevention With Certain Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Is Effective For Patients Without Underlying Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080414170953.htm
American Association for Cancer Research. "Colon Adenoma Prevention With Certain Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Is Effective For Patients Without Underlying Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080414170953.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Patient Told Hospital He Was from Liberia

Ebola Patient Told Hospital He Was from Liberia

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) The first Ebola patient diagnosed in the U.S. initially went to a Dallas emergency room last week but was sent home, despite telling a nurse that he had been in disease-ravaged West Africa, the hospital acknowledged Wednesday. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins