Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Surgeons Complete First Single-incision Lap-band Surgery In Texas

Date:
June 13, 2008
Source:
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Summary:
Surgeons have just completed the first single-incision Lap-Band weight-loss surgery in Texas. Rather than the traditional five small incisions used for traditional laparoscopic gastric banding surgery, surgeons used a single 8-centimeter incision, reducing future scarring and accelerating healing.

UT Southwestern Medical Center surgeons have completed the first single-incision Lap-Band weight-loss surgery in Texas. Rather than the traditional five small incisions used for traditional laparoscopic gastric banding surgery, surgeons used a single 8-centimeter incision, reducing future scarring and accelerating healing.

Related Articles


"There's a current revolution in minimally invasive surgery: Can we make laparoscopic surgery better by decreasing the number of incisions?" said Dr. Daniel Scott, associate professor of surgery and director of the Center for Minimally Invasive Surgery at UT Southwestern. "The theory behind this, not yet proven, is that fewer scars are better cosmetically and for pain control. The pain may be less because you alleviate additional cuts, and therefore the recovery may be hastened."

The trend has taken two paths. With SILS, or single-incision laparoscopic surgery, surgeons make one incision instead of several through the abdominal wall. NOTES, or natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, involves instrumentation access through an existing orifice such as the mouth, colon or vagina.

"SILS may be an appropriate compromise between conventional laparoscopic surgery that uses multiple incisions and multiple access ports, and NOTES, which strives to do away with all incisions on the abdominal wall and go through alternative natural access points of the body and therefore hide all the scars," Dr. Scott said.

Dr. Scott and Dr. Homero Rivas, assistant professor of surgery, completed the 2-hour procedure April 1 at UT Southwestern University Hospital - Zale Lipshy. Surgeons used a special camera to see around obstructions and special graspers with a curved tip.

"We have a track record of innovations here," Dr. Scott said.

UT Southwestern surgeons were the first in a three-state area to perform laparoscopic gastric-bypass surgeries in the late 1990s. They also performed the region's first Lap-Band procedures.

UT Southwestern surgeons have achieved several firsts in single-incision surgery, including the nation's first single-incision kidney removal, North Texas' first single-incision gallbladder surgery and the first single-incision hysterectomy in Durango, Mexico. UT Southwestern surgeons have also performed single-incision colectomies and appendectomies.

UT Southwestern surgeons are part of a national group evaluating the feasibility and safety of single-incision surgeries and have a joint academic venture with surgeons in Shanghai, China, to develop the techniques.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by UT Southwestern Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

UT Southwestern Medical Center. "Surgeons Complete First Single-incision Lap-band Surgery In Texas." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080613101117.htm>.
UT Southwestern Medical Center. (2008, June 13). Surgeons Complete First Single-incision Lap-band Surgery In Texas. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080613101117.htm
UT Southwestern Medical Center. "Surgeons Complete First Single-incision Lap-band Surgery In Texas." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080613101117.htm (accessed March 3, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mom Triumphs Over Tragedy, Helps Other Families

Mom Triumphs Over Tragedy, Helps Other Families

AP (Mar. 3, 2015) After her son, Dax, died from a rare form of leukemia, Julie Locke decided to give back to the doctors at St. Jude Children&apos;s Research Hospital who tried to save his life. She raised $1.6M to help other patients and their families. (March 3) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Woman Convicted of Poisoning Son

Woman Convicted of Poisoning Son

AP (Mar. 3, 2015) A woman who blogged for years about her son&apos;s constant health woes was convicted Monday of poisoning him to death by force-feeding heavy concentrations of sodium through his stomach tube. (March 3) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Treadmill Test Can Predict Chance Of Death Within A Decade

Treadmill Test Can Predict Chance Of Death Within A Decade

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) Johns Hopkins researchers analyzed 58,000 heart stress tests to come up with a formula that predicts a person&apos;s chances of dying in the next decade. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Going Gluten-Free Could Get You A Tax Break

Going Gluten-Free Could Get You A Tax Break

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) If a doctor advises you to remove gluten from your diet, you could get a tax deduction on the amount you spend on gluten-free foods. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins