Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Don't Know If You Are Pregnant? Same-day Pregnancy Test Provides Guidance To Pre-surgery Patients

Date:
June 16, 2008
Source:
Hospital for Special Surgery
Summary:
The first trimester of any pregnancy is a precarious time, as about 15 percent of women who know they are pregnant will spontaneously miscarry. This risk increases when pregnant women undergo surgery, which is why Hospital for Special Surgery instituted a same-day pregnancy testing protocol. This protocol is effective in identifying unknown pregnancies to the benefit of the patient, the physician and the hospital.

The first trimester of any pregnancy is a precarious time, as about 15 percent of women who know they are pregnant will spontaneously miscarry. This risk increases when pregnant women undergo surgery, which is why Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York instituted a same-day pregnancy testing protocol. A study published in the April issue of Anesthesia and Analgesia shows that this protocol is effective in identifying unknown pregnancies to the benefit of the patient, the physician and the hospital.

"There are no standard recommendations and it is my sense that most places do not have a protocol like this in effect," said Richard L. Kahn, M.D., attending anesthesiologist at Hospital for Special Surgery and lead author of the study. "But the majority of the surgeries HSS performs are elective. By testing all women of child-bearing age on the same day of their surgery we can make sure that the patient has all the facts to make the best informed decision."

The doctors found of 2,588 women tested, five patients had a positive pregnancy test. All of the patients postponed surgery and only one was a false positive.

The American Society of Anesthesiologists gives individual hospitals and physicians the opportunity to define and institute their own policies in regards to pre-operation pregnancy testing. Like many hospitals, Hospital for Special Surgery had been conducting some tests a week before the scheduled surgery, but it wasn't a consistent protocol.

"Pregnancy hormone levels can change within the week leading up to surgery, and HSS was concerned that it was missing some pregnancies," said Dr. Kahn. "We instituted the new policy in November 2004 and the study looked at the cost-benefit ratio within the first full year, January 2005 -- January 2006, that the protocol was in effect."

While there is no conclusive evidence, there are associated pregnancy risks with any surgery. Both the stress the mother is under during surgery or the anesthesia could contribute to a spontaneous miscarriage or to an increased chance of birth defects. Doctors at Hospital for Special Surgery always explain the risks to patients who are pregnant, but if the patient herself doesn't know she is pregnant she may not spend much time weighing the risks.

The direct cost associated with each urine pregnancy test is $5.03. Therefore, it cost HSS $3,273 in lab and labor costs to detect each unrecognized pregnancy, though this does not include the indirect costs associated with a cancelled surgery. However, if a woman who didn't know she was pregnant went on to either lose the pregnancy or have a child with a birth defect, the unknown role that anesthesia and surgery may have played in this can be devastating to patient and physician. The benefit of eliminating this possibility, Dr. Kahn said, is more than enough to justify the cost of testing and inconvenience of a postponed surgery.

"Based on the outcome of this study, the same-day pregnancy testing is still in effect at HSS," said Dr. Kahn. "If I were to move to another hospital that did not perform same-day pregnancy testing, I would work to institute a similar policy. What it comes down to is providing the best care for our patients, and I believe this protocol allows us to do that."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Hospital for Special Surgery. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Hospital for Special Surgery. "Don't Know If You Are Pregnant? Same-day Pregnancy Test Provides Guidance To Pre-surgery Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616091608.htm>.
Hospital for Special Surgery. (2008, June 16). Don't Know If You Are Pregnant? Same-day Pregnancy Test Provides Guidance To Pre-surgery Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616091608.htm
Hospital for Special Surgery. "Don't Know If You Are Pregnant? Same-day Pregnancy Test Provides Guidance To Pre-surgery Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616091608.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins