Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Quantum Physics: Disentangling Strange Behavior Of Qubits

Date:
August 8, 2008
Source:
Basque Research
Summary:
Current technology enables the building of electrical circuits similar to those we use at home but reduced thousands of times in size to a micrometric scale of thousandths of a millimeter. When these circuits are built of superconductor materials and at near-absolute zero cryogenic temperatures, the world of everyday physics is left behind and the amazing world of quantum physics is entered. In this circuit the behavior is something like an artificial atom (i.e. like the so-called quantum bits ("qubits") of quantum computers) and the concepts of quantum optics, quantum information and condensed matter are mixed.

Current technology enables the building of electrical circuits similar to those we use at home but reduced thousands of times in size to a micrometric scale of thousandths of a millimetre. When these circuits are built of superconductor materials and at near-absolute zero cryogenic temperatures, the world of everyday physics is left behind and the amazing world of quantum physics is entered.

Related Articles


In this circuit the behaviour is something like an artificial atom (i.e. like the so-called quantum bits (“qubits”) of quantum computers) and the concepts of quantum optics, quantum information and condensed matter are mixed.

An Ikerbasque researcher, ascribed to the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Enrique Solano, together with colleagues from Germany and Japan, have been working on an experiment and a theoretical model that show that certain quantum leaps are prohibited at times between levels of a qubit superconductor.

This phenomenon is produced on sending photons of light with sufficient energy against a qubit installed within a circuit that simulates the behaviour of microwaves, similar to the ovens commonly used domestically but at a micrometric scale.

To explain this in an easy way, consider a household circuit where, as with any such circuit, sufficient energy has to be supplied in order to move electrons from one place to another, i.e. the required voltage has to be applied.

In an atomic circuit, however, the required energy is supplied through photons of light but this is not sufficient to produce the famous quantum jumps between two atomic energy levels. The additional required factor is the presence of the symmetry of the qubit, an enhancing factor, as it were. It is as if it were not enough for the quantum nature to have the required energy and it requires, moreover, the presence of the qubit to enable – or otherwise – the quantum leaps stimulated by the photons of light energy.

If the qubit presents itself with symmetrical potential, the jump is prohibited and is not produced; curiously, if the potential is asymmetric, the quantum leap is permitted. This strange behaviour has been demonstrated by these researchers both at a theoretical level and in the laboratory, where the rules of prohibition may be activated and deactivated at will.

This research is an important step in the thorough understanding of the quantum jumps permitted and prohibited in superconductor circuits, as well as in the potential application of the electrodynamic quantum of circuits to future technology in quantum computation and information.

Enrique Solano is a PhD in Physics from the Federal University of Río de Janeiro. After working at the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich, he has been carrying out his research over the last few months at the UPV/EHU.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Basque Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Deppe et al. Two-photon probe of the Jaynes–Cummings model and controlled symmetry breaking in circuit QED. Nature Physics, 2008; DOI: 10.1038/nphys1016

Cite This Page:

Basque Research. "Quantum Physics: Disentangling Strange Behavior Of Qubits." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725093454.htm>.
Basque Research. (2008, August 8). Quantum Physics: Disentangling Strange Behavior Of Qubits. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725093454.htm
Basque Research. "Quantum Physics: Disentangling Strange Behavior Of Qubits." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725093454.htm (accessed October 26, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Real-Life Transformer Robot Walks, Then Folds Into a Car

Real-Life Transformer Robot Walks, Then Folds Into a Car

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — Brave Robotics and Asratec teamed with original Transformers toy company Tomy to create a functional 5-foot-tall humanoid robot that can march and fold itself into a 3-foot-long sports car. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Police Testing New Gunfire Tracking Technology

Police Testing New Gunfire Tracking Technology

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A California-based startup has designed new law enforcement technology that aims to automatically alert dispatch when an officer's gun is unholstered and fired. Two law enforcement agencies are currently testing the technology. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins