Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Antimicrobial Sutures Reduce Infections In Brain Shunt Surgery, Study Finds

Date:
July 28, 2008
Source:
University at Buffalo
Summary:
Using antimicrobial sutures to secure the shunt and close the wound significantly reduces the number of shunt infections arising during the first six months after surgery.

Children born with hydrocephalus, or "water on the brain" must have shunts implanted to drain the fluid away from the brain to reduce harmful pressure.

Related Articles


While shunts do their job well, the rate of shunt infection in children is very high for a variety of reasons, which requires putting the child through another surgery to replace the shunt, bringing with it more hospital time, potential additional neurological complications and an increased risk of death.

Now a new trial conducted by faculty at the University at Buffalo has shown that using antimicrobial sutures to secure the shunt and close the wound significantly reduces the number of shunt infections arising during the first six months after surgery.

Results of the trial appear online in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics and will be published in the August issue of the journal.

Sixty-one children requiring shunt surgery were assigned randomly to undergo their surgery with antimicrobial sutures, considered the study group, or with usual sutures, which served as the control group. A total of 84 shunt procedures were performed over 21 months. All procedures were performed by one of two pediatric neurosurgeons at Women & Children's Hospital of Kaleida Health in Buffalo.

At the trial's end, the shunt infection rate in the study group was 4.3 percent (2 of 46 procedures), compared to 21 percent (8 of 38 procedures) in the control group.

"Many techniques and devices have been investigated to reduce shunt infection rates," said Curtis J. Rozzelle, M.D., assistant professor of neurosurgery in UB's School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and first author on the paper. He also is surgical director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program at Women & Children's Hospital. "Some studies, but not all, found that antibiotic-impregnated shunt systems in particular appear to reduce infection risk," noted Rozzelle. "Unfortunately, none of these studies were prospective, randomized and double-blinded.

"In animal trials sutures coated with the antimicrobial triclosan have been shown to reduce the number of bacteria adhering to sutures, but only one study has been published to date on their effect in preventing surgical site infection, so we decided to conduct our own trial," he said.

"Our results showed that using antimicrobial sutures reduced infection risk by 16 percent."

Antibiotic-impregnated shunts, which are used in some surgeries, have several limitations, said Rozzelle: "They don't provide complete protection, they can't be used in patients who are allergic to the antibiotics and they are a lot more expensive than non-impregnated shunts."

"Closing wounds with antimicrobial sutures may reduce infections in procedures implanting other devices, such as pacemakers and neurostimulators, pumps that deliver pharmaceuticals and shunts elsewhere in the body," he said.

Rozzelle and colleagues are planning to conduct a larger randomized controlled trial to confirm their initial findings.

Jody Leonardo, M.D., clinical assistant instructor, and Veetai Li, M.D., associate professor, both from the UB Department of Neurosurgery and Kaleida Health, contributed significantly to the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University at Buffalo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University at Buffalo. "Antimicrobial Sutures Reduce Infections In Brain Shunt Surgery, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725114550.htm>.
University at Buffalo. (2008, July 28). Antimicrobial Sutures Reduce Infections In Brain Shunt Surgery, Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725114550.htm
University at Buffalo. "Antimicrobial Sutures Reduce Infections In Brain Shunt Surgery, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725114550.htm (accessed February 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Hikers Rescued After Fall from Oregon Mountain

Hikers Rescued After Fall from Oregon Mountain

AP (Feb. 1, 2015) Two climbers who were hurt in a fall on Mount Hood are now being treated for their injuries. Rescue officials say they were airlifted off the mountain Saturday afternoon by an Oregon National Guard helicopter. (Feb. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Glasses Augment Reality to Help Visually Impaired

Smart Glasses Augment Reality to Help Visually Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 1, 2015) New augmented reality smart glasses developed by researchers at Oxford University can help people with visual impairments improve their vision by providing depth-based feedback, allowing users to "see" better. Joel Flynn reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Season Hitting Elderly Hard

Flu Season Hitting Elderly Hard

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 31, 2015) The CDC says this year&apos;s flu season is hitting people 65 years of age and older especially hard. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) The CDC is urging people to get vaccinated for measles amid an outbreak that began at Disneyland and has now infected more than 90 people. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins