Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Same Dose Of Anthracycline Is Not Safe For Everyone, Study Finds

Date:
August 4, 2008
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
Not all patients can tolerate the currently recommended cumulative dose of epirubicin. New models can help physicians calculate the epirubicin dose associated with a 5 percent risk of cardiotoxicity for individual patients.

Not all patients can tolerate the currently recommended cumulative dose of epirubicin. New models can help physicians calculate the epirubicin dose associated with a 5 percent risk of cardiotoxicity for individual patients, researchers report in the July 29 online issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Oncologists frequently use anthracyclines, including epirubicin and doxorubicin, to treat breast cancer patients. However, the drugs cause lasting heart problems in a substantial number of patients. To limit the problem, current treatment guidelines suggest that patients receive no more than 900 mg/m2 epirubicin over the course of their cancer care.

In the current study, Marianne Ryberg, M.D., of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues followed 1,097 patients with metastatic breast cancer who were treated in a single hospital near Copenhagen between 1983 and 2003. The researchers assessed patients' risk factors for cardiotoxicity and corrected for the risk of death from all other competing causes of death, including cancer. (The studies that have previously concluded that the upper safe limit of epirubicin is 900 mg/m2 have not generally corrected for other causes of death.) Using these data, they calculated the maximum cumulative dose of epirubicin that is associated with a 5 percent risk of developing heart disease.

Ryberg and colleagues found that patient age, predisposition to heart disease, previous chest irradiation, and prior hormonal cancer therapy were associated with an individual's risk of developing heart problems following epirubicin treatment. By contrast, the researchers found that treatment with less epirubicin, a higher tumor burden, prior chemotherapy, and older age of the patient were associated with an increased risk of death from other, non-cardiac, causes.

Based on these data, the researchers lowered the cumulative dose recommended for most patients, with maximum doses ranging from 300 mg/m2 to 900 mg/m2. "Treatment with a potentially cardiotoxic drug may often be inevitable to extend survival for a cancer patient. However, it is essential to be aware of the risk of cardiotoxicity, not only because cardiotoxicity can progress to a potentially fatal out¬come if not treated but also because it lowers the quality of patient life," the authors write.

In an accompanying editorial, Dawn Hershman, M.D., and Alfred I. Neugut, M.D., Ph.D., of Columbia University Medical Center in New York write that it has been difficult to predict which patients are most likely to develop cardiotoxicity following anthracycline therapy. Neither randomized clinical trials nor studies that rely on large administrative databases are adequate for addressing the issue. Therefore, Ryberg's study is an important step to helping physicians personalize cancer care for their patients.

"If we can better predict who is at greatest risk for toxicity and who is not, we may be able to comfortably offer stan¬dard treatment to a larger percentage of the population," the editorialists write.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Same Dose Of Anthracycline Is Not Safe For Everyone, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080729235322.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2008, August 4). Same Dose Of Anthracycline Is Not Safe For Everyone, Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080729235322.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Same Dose Of Anthracycline Is Not Safe For Everyone, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080729235322.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) — Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) — Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

AP (July 30, 2014) — At least 20 New Jersey residents have tested positive for chikungunya, a mosquito-borne virus that has spread through the Caribbean. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Newsy (July 30, 2014) — The Center for Science in the Public Interest released its 2014 list of single meals with whopping calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:  

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile iPhone Android Web
      Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins