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Going From Ulcers To Cancer

Date:
August 24, 2008
Source:
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Summary:
Researchers have uncovered a big clue as to why some of the bacteria that cause stomach ulcers pose a greater risk for serious problems like stomach cancer than others; it turns out these bacteria can exploit the surrounding stomach cells to protect them from the immune system.

Researchers have uncovered a big clue as to why some of the bacteria that cause stomach ulcers pose a greater risk for serious problems like stomach cancer than others; it turns out these bacteria can exploit the surrounding stomach cells to protect them from the immune system.

Helicobacter pylori is a bacterial strain that can infect the human stomach and induce inflammation, ulcers, and potentially even stomach cancer. However, only a small fraction of H. pylori infections ultimately lead to cancer, leading researchers to figure out what biological events will trigger this path.

One type of H. pylori strain that seems to increase disease risk is the cag+ strain, which contains a set of proteins that allows it to inject bacterial proteins into cells following attachment to the stomach lining; this interaction between bacteria and gastric cells may be a key contributor to chronic damage.

Richard Peek and colleagues investigated a cag+ strain in mouse models of H. pylori infection and found that a protein called CagE could induce gastric cells to turn on a receptor called Decay-accelerating factor (DAF); DAF acts to remove nearby immune proteins that can kill cells to prevent unwanted immune damage.

In essence, the bacteria use the DAF receptor on the host cell they're attached to like a bodyguard to protect them from the immune system. Peek and colleagues also note that by continually inducing DAF expression, H. pylori creates an environment of persistent inflammation that can reduce the threshold required for more serious diseases to develop.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. O'Brien et al. Regulation of the Helicobacter pylori Cellular Receptor Decay-accelerating Factor. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2008; 283 (35): 23922 DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M801144200

Cite This Page:

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. "Going From Ulcers To Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080822120144.htm>.
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. (2008, August 24). Going From Ulcers To Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080822120144.htm
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. "Going From Ulcers To Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080822120144.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

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