Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nearly Half Of US Adults Will Develop Painful Knee Osteoarthritis By Age 85: Study

Date:
September 3, 2008
Source:
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Summary:
Almost half of all US adults and nearly two-thirds of obese adults will develop painful osteoarthritis of the knee by age 85, a new study suggests.

Almost half of all U.S. adults and nearly two-thirds of obese adults will develop painful osteoarthritis of the knee by age 85, a study based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests.

The study also found that a person’s lifetime risk rose as their body mass index or BMI increased, with the greatest risk found in those whose weight was normal at age 18 but were overweight or obese at 45 or older.

“These results show how important weight management is for people throughout their lives,” said Dr. Joanne Jordan, principal investigator of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project and senior study author. “Simply put, people who keep their weight within the normal range are much less likely to develop symptomatic knee osteoarthritis as they get older and thus much less likely to face the need for major surgical procedures, such as knee replacement surgery.”

The study also sends an important message to physicians, said Jordan, director of the Thurston Arthritis Research Center and professor of medicine and orthopaedics in the School of Medicine at the University. “They need to include the risk of knee osteoarthritis in the discussion when counseling patients about weight management and they need to factor that risk into their treatment plans.”

The results were published in the Sept. 15, 2008 issue of Arthritis Care & Research. Lead author of the report is Louise Murphy, Ph.D. of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Murphy led the data analysis and the CDC is the primary funder of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

In the study, researchers collected and analyzed data over a 13-year period from 3,068 men and women 45 years old and older who live in Johnston County, N.C. At two separate points during the study, each participant was interviewed at home and given a clinical exam that included taking X-ray images of their knees and measuring their BMI. They were interviewed a second time two weeks after the clinical exam. In addition, researchers calculated the subjects’ BMI at age 18 based on their self report of height and weight at that age.

After all data were collected, researchers estimated the lifetime risk of symptomatic osteoarthritis in at least one knee using logistic regression models of statistical analysis. They found that the lifetime risk of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis was 44.7 percent.

There were no significant differences in risk related to a participant’s sex, race or education level. However, obese participants had a significantly higher lifetime risk, 64.5 percent compared to 34.9 percent for normal weight and 44.1 percent for overweight participants. Those with a history knee injury also had a higher risk than those without, 56.8 percent compared to 42.3 percent.

A separate analysis of BMI across the span of participants’ lives found that those who had a normal weight at age 18 and at their baseline and follow up visits had the lowest risk (29.2 percent) while those who reported a normal weight at 18 but were overweight or obese at the two later time points had the highest risk (59.9) percent.

Although the participants in this study all live in the same relatively rural county in the South, the lifetime risk of knee arthritis is likely high in the rest of the U.S. as well, the researchers wrote. They concluded that the study “underscores the need for public health weight loss and management interventions” that would help decrease the risk.

Besides Jordan, UNC authors of the study include Todd A. Schwartz, Dr.P.H., Gary Koch, Ph.D. and William D. Kalsbeek, Ph.D., all from the UNC School of Public Health; and Jordan B. Renner, M.D., from the School of Medicine.

In addition to Murphy, study authors not at UNC include Charles G. Helmick, M.D., of the CDC; Gail Tudor, Ph.D. of Huston College in Bangor, Maine; Anca Dragomir, Ph.D., who earned her Ph.D. at UNC but now works at the National Institutes of Health; and Gheorghe Luta, Ph.D., who also earned his Ph.D. at UNC and is now at Georgetown University Medical Center.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of North Carolina School of Medicine. "Nearly Half Of US Adults Will Develop Painful Knee Osteoarthritis By Age 85: Study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080902143241.htm>.
University of North Carolina School of Medicine. (2008, September 3). Nearly Half Of US Adults Will Develop Painful Knee Osteoarthritis By Age 85: Study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080902143241.htm
University of North Carolina School of Medicine. "Nearly Half Of US Adults Will Develop Painful Knee Osteoarthritis By Age 85: Study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080902143241.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Aimed at reducing sexual assaults on college campuses, California has adopted a new law changing the standard of consent for sexual activity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Researchers looked at 1,500 blood samples and determined people who developed pancreatic cancer had more branched chain amino acids. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins