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Scientist Uncovers Miscalculation In Geological Undersea Record

Date:
September 13, 2008
Source:
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science
Summary:
The precise timing of the origin of life on Earth and the changes in life during the past 4.5 billion years has been a subject of great controversy for the past century. The principal indicator of the amount of organic carbon produced by biological activity traditionally used is the ratio of the less abundant isotope of carbon, 13C, to the more abundant isotope, 12C. A new study challenges how geologists interpret variations in the 13C/12C ratio throughout Earth's history.

A new study examines changes in carbon isotope ratios over the past 10 million years at sites off the Bahamas (Atlantic Ocean), the Maldives (Indian Ocean), and Great Barrier Reef (Pacific Ocean).
Credit: NASA

The precise timing of the origin of life on Earth and the changes in life during the past 4.5 billion years has been a subject of great controversy for the past century.

The principal indicator of the amount of organic carbon produced by biological activity traditionally used is the ratio of the less abundant isotope of carbon, 13C, to the more abundant isotope, 12C. As plants preferentially incorporate 12C, during periods of high production of organic material the 13C/12C ratio of carbonate material becomes elevated. Using this principle, the history of organic material has been interpreted by geologists using the 13C/12C ratio of carbonates and organics, wherever these materials can be sampled and dated.

While this idea appears to be sound over the last 150 million years or so, prior to this time there are no open oceanic sediment records which record the 13C/12C ratio, and therefore, geologists are forced to use materials associated with carbonate platforms or epicontinental seas.

In order to test whether platform-associated sediments are related to the global carbon cycle, a paper by University of Miami Professor Dr. Peter K. Swart appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This paper examines changes over the past 10 million years at sites off the Bahamas (Atlantic Ocean), the Maldives (Indian Ocean), and Great Barrier Reef (Pacific Ocean). The variations in the 13C/12C ratio are synchronous at all of the sites studied, but are unrelated to the global change in the 13C/12C ratio.

It appears that records related to carbonate platforms which are often used throughout the early history of the Earth are not good recorders of the 13C/12C ratio in the open oceans. Hence, the work presented suggests that assumptions made previously about changes in the 13C/12C ratios of carbonate sediments in the geological record are incorrect.

"This study is a major step in terms of rethinking how geologists interpret variations in the 13C/12C ratio throughout Earth's history. If the approach does not work over the past 10 million years, then why would it work during older time periods?" said Swart. "As a consequence of our findings, changes in 13C/12C records need to be reevaluated, conclusions regarding changes in the reservoirs of carbon will have to be reassessed, and some of the widely-held ideas regarding the elevation of CO2 during specific periods of the Earth's geological history will have to be adjusted."

The study is funded by the National Science Foundation and the Comparative Sedimentology Laboratory at the University of Miami.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Peter K. Swart. Global synchronous changes in the carbon isotopic composition of carbonate sediments unrelated to changes in the global carbon cycle. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2008; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0802841105

Cite This Page:

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. "Scientist Uncovers Miscalculation In Geological Undersea Record." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080910104202.htm>.
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. (2008, September 13). Scientist Uncovers Miscalculation In Geological Undersea Record. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080910104202.htm
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. "Scientist Uncovers Miscalculation In Geological Undersea Record." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080910104202.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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