Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Studies Highlight The Importance Of Bowel Prep And Effectiveness Of Colonoscopy

Date:
October 6, 2008
Source:
American College of Gastroenterology
Summary:
New research emphasizes the importance of adequate bowel preparation prior to colonoscopy, and highlights the remarkable effectiveness of colonoscopy in detecting and removing pre-cancerous polyps, particularly tiny, flat, potentially pre-cancerous growths in the colon known as "sessile serrated adenomas."

New research presented at the American College of Gastroenterology's 73rd Annual Scientific Meeting in Orlando emphasizes the importance of adequate bowel preparation prior to colonoscopy, and highlights the remarkable effectiveness of colonoscopy in detecting and removing pre-cancerous polyps, particularly tiny, flat, potentially pre-cancerous growths in the colon known as "sessile serrated adenomas."

Dr. Brindusa Truta and Francisco C. Ramirez of the Carl T. Hayden VA Medical Center in Phoenix analyzed data of 21,600 colonoscopies performed at their institution from January 1998 to December 2007.

Researchers analyzed findings from 280 patients who underwent more than one colonoscopy in the last ten years, and had at least one positive fecal occult blood test (FOBT). Twenty two percent (57 patients) of these patients had a 'cleared' exam, but underwent repeat colonoscopy after receiving a positive FOBT result. Researchers found 5 percent of patients had colon cancer, 33 percent had adenomatous polyps, and 26 percent of patients with adenomas had advanced neoplasia. The average time interval between the first colonoscopy and the repeat colonoscopy for a positive FOBT was 39 months. Poor quality bowel preparation at the initial colonoscopy was associated with more missed cancers and undetected polyps.

According to lead investigator Dr. Truta, "A positive fecal occult blood test after a 'cleared' colonoscopy should trigger a repeat colonoscopy, especially if a suboptimal bowel preparation was encountered at the initial exam."

Not All Small Polyps Are Innocent

In a separate study, Dr. Suryakanth R. Gurudu and his colleagues at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona examined medical records from the Clinic's pathology database of patients who had sessile serrated adenomas removed with colonoscopy between 2005 and 2007.

Sessile serrated adenomas are a sub-class of tiny, flat pre-cancerous polyps, often found on the right side of the colon. "While small polyps are generally considered less dangerous than large polyps, not all small polyps are innocent," said lead investigator Dr. Gurudu.

Of the 5,991 patients who were found to have polyps, sessile serrated adenomas comprised 2.9 percent of all polyps removed. The sessile serrated adenomas were small and 42 percent were less than or equal to 5mm in size, while 69 percent were less than or equal to 9 mm in size. Ninety-seven percent of polyps were removed by colonoscopy and 2.7 percent required surgical excision.

According to Dr. Gurudu, "Many of these polyps due to their size and shape might have gone undetected or not reported on an x-ray exam of the colon known as CT colonography. The effectiveness of cancer prevention comes from removing all precancerous lesions with colonoscopy, regardless of size."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Gastroenterology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Gastroenterology. "New Studies Highlight The Importance Of Bowel Prep And Effectiveness Of Colonoscopy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006102531.htm>.
American College of Gastroenterology. (2008, October 6). New Studies Highlight The Importance Of Bowel Prep And Effectiveness Of Colonoscopy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006102531.htm
American College of Gastroenterology. "New Studies Highlight The Importance Of Bowel Prep And Effectiveness Of Colonoscopy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006102531.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) The ebola virus outbreak in West Africa is now linked to 121 deaths. Health officials fear the virus will continue to spread in urban areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) A new study out of Canada says cognitive motor performance begins deteriorating around age 24. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Mt. Everest Helped Scientists Research Diabetes

How Mt. Everest Helped Scientists Research Diabetes

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) British researchers were able to use Mount Everest's low altitudes to study insulin resistance. They hope to find ways to treat diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Carpenter's Injury Leads To Hundreds Of 3-D-Printed Hands

Carpenter's Injury Leads To Hundreds Of 3-D-Printed Hands

Newsy (Apr. 14, 2014) Richard van As lost all fingers on his right hand in a woodworking accident. Now, he's used the incident to create a prosthetic to help hundreds. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins