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Possible Mechanism For Creating 'Handedness' In Biological Molecules

Date:
December 2, 2008
Source:
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory
Summary:
The basic molecules that make up all living things have a predetermined chirality or "handedness," similar to the way people are right or left handed. This chirality has a profound influence on the chemistry and molecular interactions of living organisms. Scientists have discovered a way to induce this handedness in pre-biological molecules.

Argonne chemist Richard Rosenberg examines source material for an experiment to induce chirality into pre-biological systems at the Advanced Photon Source. Rosenberg used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to measure the secondary electron induced photolysis reaction rate of a model chiral compound adsorbed on a magnetic substrate. He found that changing the magnetization direction in relation to the high-intensity X-ray beam created an excess of one chirality over another.
Credit: Image courtesy of DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

The basic molecules that make up all living things have a predetermined chirality or "handedness," similar to the way people are right- or left-handed. This chirality has a profound influence on the chemistry and molecular interactions of living organisms. The inception of chirality from the elementary building blocks of matter is one of the great mysteries of the origin of life.

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a way to induce this handedness in pre-biological molecules.

"Understanding how the molecules necessary for life originated is one of the most basic scientific questions in biochemistry," Argonne chemist Richard Rosenberg said. "Chirality plays a fundamental role in biological processes and researchers have been trying to discover the mechanisms that led to this property for years."

Rosenberg used X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source to bombard chiral molecules adsorbed on a magnetic substrate and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to track changes in the molecular bonds.

He found that changing the magnetization direction in relation to the high-intensity X-ray beam created an excess of one chirality over another. Changing the magnetization direction reverses the spin polarization of the secondary, or low-energy, electrons emitted from the substance.

Iron is a common element and is magnetic in many form and ionizing radiation and magnetic fields are prevalent throughout the universe.

Based on the Argonne results, it is conceivable that chirality could have been introduced by irradiation of molecules as they traveled through the universe while adsorbed on a magnetized substrate in a dust cloud, meteor, comet or on a primitive planet.

"Our study shows that spin-polarized secondary electrons interacting with chiral molecules could produce a significant excess of a given chirality in pre-biological molecules," Rosenberg said.

A paper on Rosenberg's work can be seen in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by DOE/Argonne National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

DOE/Argonne National Laboratory. "Possible Mechanism For Creating 'Handedness' In Biological Molecules." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081201144735.htm>.
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory. (2008, December 2). Possible Mechanism For Creating 'Handedness' In Biological Molecules. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081201144735.htm
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory. "Possible Mechanism For Creating 'Handedness' In Biological Molecules." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081201144735.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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