Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lenalidomide Safe As Single Therapy For Elderly Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients, Study Suggests

Date:
December 8, 2008
Source:
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Summary:
The oral medication lenalidomide is safe and well-tolerated for elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a group without a well-defined frontline therapy for their disease, according to a new study.

The oral medication lenalidomide is safe and well-tolerated for elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a group without a well-defined frontline therapy for their disease, researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reported today at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

"Lenalidomide has a favorable toxicity profile and shows signs of activity against CLL in our phase II clinical trial to date," said study presenter Alessandra Ferrajoli, M.D., associate professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Leukemia.

Patients start on a 5 mg dose of the drug in pill form and the dose escalates over time in 5 mg increments to a maximum of 25 mg. The median age of participants is 72. Chemo-immunotherapy therapy combinations that are effective in younger patients with CLL tend to be associated with a high rate of complications in patients older than 70, Ferrajoli said.

Of 43 patients enrolled in the study, 35 were evaluable because they had been treated for at least three months. Nineteen of these (54 percent) achieved a partial response, where the disease is diminished, 14 patients (40 percent) had stable disease and continue on therapy, and two had their CLL progress.

Lenalidomide also rapidly reduced the number of circulating lymphocytes – the hallmark of the disease – in the patients' blood. Ferrajoli said 47 percent achieved a blood complete response and 38 percent had at least a partial response.

Patients on the trial for at least two months were evaluated for the drug's potential side effects. Of those 39 patients, 10 (26 percent) had decreased bone marrow activity resulting in a decrease in the number of either white blood cells called neutrophils or of platelets. Three patients had infections, two had fever and one had pneumonia.

All patients registered in the study remain alive with 37 of the 43 continuing on treatment. Ferrajoli said the trial will include up to 60 patients.

Lenalidomide, a drug developed by Celgene Corp. known commercially as Revlimid®, attacks both malignant cells and the cellular environment that nurtures them. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the drug for treatment of multiple myeloma and some forms of myelodysplastic syndrome.

The clinical trial is funded by Celgene.

Co-authors with Ferrajoli are Susan O'Brien, M.D., William Wierda, M.D., Ph.D., Stefan Faderl, M.D., Zeev Estrov, M.D., Kimberly Yerrow, R.N., Hagop Kantarjian, M.D., and Michael Keating, M.D., all of the Department of Leukemia; and Steven Kornblau, M.D. of the Department of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy and the Department of Leukemia.

Ferrajoli has received honoraria and research funding from Celgene. O'Brien and Keating have consulted for Celgene.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. "Lenalidomide Safe As Single Therapy For Elderly Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081208100858.htm>.
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. (2008, December 8). Lenalidomide Safe As Single Therapy For Elderly Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081208100858.htm
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. "Lenalidomide Safe As Single Therapy For Elderly Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081208100858.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) — West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) — A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) — Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) — Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins