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New Evidence That Humans Make Aspirin's Active Principle -- Salicylic Acid

Date:
December 26, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting evidence that humans can make their own salicylic acid -- the material formed when aspirin breaks down in the body. Salicylic acid, which is responsible for aspirin's renowned effects in relieving pain and inflammation, may be the first in a new class of bioregulators, according to a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Scientists in the United Kingdom are reporting new evidence that humans can make their own salicylic acid (SA) — the material formed when aspirin breaks down in the body. SA, which is responsible for aspirin's renowned effects in relieving pain and inflammation, may be the first in a new class of bioregulators, according to a new study.

In the report, Gwendoline Baxter, Ph.D. and colleagues discuss how their past research revealed that SA exists in the blood of people who have not recently taken aspirin. Vegetarians had much higher levels, almost matching those in patients taking low doses of aspirin. Based on those findings, the researchers previously concluded that this endogenous SA came from the diet, since SA is a natural substance found in fruits and vegetables.

Now the group reports on studies of changes in SA levels in volunteers who took benzoic acid, a substance also found naturally in fruits and vegetables that the body could potentially use to make SA. Their goal was to determine whether the SA found in humans (and other animals) results solely from consumption of fruits and vegetables, or whether humans produce their own SA as a natural agent to fight inflammation and disease. The results reported in the study suggest that people do manufacture SA.

"It is, we suspect, increasingly likely that SA is a biopharmaceutical with a central, broadly defensive role in animals as well as plants," they state. "This simple organic chemical is, we propose, likely to become increasingly recognized as an animal bioregulator, perhaps in a class of its own."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Paterson et al. Salicylic Acid sans Aspirin in Animals and Man: Persistence in Fasting and Biosynthesis from Benzoic Acid. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2008; 56 (24): 11648 DOI: 10.1021/jf800974z

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "New Evidence That Humans Make Aspirin's Active Principle -- Salicylic Acid." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081222122559.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, December 26). New Evidence That Humans Make Aspirin's Active Principle -- Salicylic Acid. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081222122559.htm
American Chemical Society. "New Evidence That Humans Make Aspirin's Active Principle -- Salicylic Acid." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081222122559.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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