Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Missing Genes Link To Psoriasis

Date:
February 2, 2009
Source:
University of Nottingham
Summary:
A new genetics finding is helping to explain why some people may be more likely to suffer from the chronic skin condition, psoriasis.

Genetics experts at The University of Nottingham have been involved in a scientific breakthrough which is helping to explain why some people may be more likely to suffer from the chronic skin condition, psoriasis.

The research, which has just been published in the journal Nature Genetics, shows that people who lack the genes LCE3B and LCE3C are more likely to be affected by psoriasis. These two genes appear to be involved in the skin’s response to damage. When these genes are missing this may leave skin relatively unprotected against the sequence of damage and inflammation that leads to the development of this uncomfortable skin disease.

John Armour, Professor of Human Genetics in the Institute of Genetics, together with Master of Research student Emma Dannhauser, were involved because of their expertise in accurate measurement of gene numbers.

Professor Armour said: "Measuring gene numbers accurately is technically challenging but is necessary to demonstrate this kind of effect. This new report adds to the growing number of examples of disorders caused by variation in the number of genes, and suggests that there may be many more examples to come. What's especially interesting about this example is that in the UK lacking these genes is actually commoner than having them."

Around 30 per cent of people with psoriasis have a family history of the condition. It has long been known that genetic predisposition is an important cause of psoriasis, but it is only recently that scientists have begun to discover the exact nature of the variations that give rise to that predisposition.

The study is the result of an international collaboration led by Professor Xavier Estivill at Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, and involving scientists from Nottingham, Nijmegen, St Louis, San Francisco, Michigan, Seattle, Rome and Evry in France.

Psoriasis is a common skin condition affecting about two per cent of the UK population, and causes patches of scaly, itchy skin. It generally affects prominent areas such as the elbows and knees, and commonly affects the scalp, but can affect any part of the skin.

Last year Professor Armour headed a research project, also published in Nature Genetics, which showed that psoriasis risk was affected by variation in the number of beta-defensin genes — a gene known to trigger skin inflammation in response to infection. The research established that people with extra copies of the gene might be more prone to developing psoriasis.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Nottingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Nottingham. "Missing Genes Link To Psoriasis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090202141230.htm>.
University of Nottingham. (2009, February 2). Missing Genes Link To Psoriasis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090202141230.htm
University of Nottingham. "Missing Genes Link To Psoriasis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090202141230.htm (accessed April 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) That little voice telling you to exercise, get in shape and get healthy is probably coming from your boss. More companies are beefing up wellness programs to try and cut down their health care costs. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) Scientists say for the extremely elderly, their stem cells might reach a state of exhaustion. This could limit one's life span. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) The Food and Drug Administration wants to crack down on the use of e-cigarettes, banning the sale of the product to minors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins