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Chocolate Drink Used In Rituals In New Mexico 1,000 Years Ago

Date:
February 5, 2009
Source:
University of New Mexico
Summary:
Inhabitants of Chaco Canyon apparently drank chocolate from cylinders about a thousand years ago. Archaeologists generally agree the vessels were used for some ritual, but there has been great disagreement about the specific use of the vessels. Crown was thinking about how the Maya drank chocolate from ceramic cylinders, and wondered whether the cylinders found at Chaco might have been used in the same way. It was clear that the Maya used the cylinders for chocolate. Experts could read the glyphs on the vessels that made it clear they were chocolate containers.

Inhabitants of Chaco Canyon apparently drank chocolate from cylinders like these about a thousand years ago.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of New Mexico

Inhabitants of Chaco Canyon apparently drank chocolate from cylinders like these about a thousand years ago. That’s the finding in a paper recently published by PNAS, a publication of the National Academy of Science and written by Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Patricia L. Crown and her Collaborator at the Hershey Center of Health and Nutrition W. Jeffrey Hurst.

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Crown has long been fascinated by ceramic cylinders excavated at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon excavated in the Hyde Exploring Expedition from 1896-1899 and the National Geographic Society Expedition from 1920 to 1927. Only about 200 of the cylinders exist and most were found in a single room at the site. The cylinders are now housed at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. and at the American Museum of Natural History.

Archaeologists generally agree the vessels were used for some ritual, but there has been great disagreement about the specific use of the vessels. Crown was thinking about how the Maya drank chocolate from ceramic cylinders, and wondered whether the cylinders found at Chaco might have been used in the same way. It was clear that the Maya used the cylinders for chocolate. Experts could read the glyphs on the vessels that made it clear they were chocolate containers.

From 2004-2007 UNM graduate and undergraduate students had excavated the trash middens directly south of Pueblo Bonito and uncovered thousands of pottery fragments that could be used for analysis. Crown selected sherds that were from cylinders or pitchers. She could tell they were dated between 1000 and 1125 A.D. based on the decorative style. She selected a few sherds and worked with a graduate student to grind off the edges for testing, then sent the material to W. Jeffrey Hurst at the Hershey Center. He tested the powder using an analytical method he had developed and found the presence of theobromine, a marker for Theobroma cacao or chocolate.

The finding is the first concrete evidence that the people of Chaco Canyon or anywhere in the Southwestern U.S. traded for cacao beans. It’s long been known there was trade with the Maya in the southern lowlands of Mexico from evidence of copper bells, cloisonnι and skeletons of scarlet macaws. Until this discovery, cacao had been found no further north than central Mexico.

Crown says anthropologists don’t know whether the people at Chaco walked to Mesoamerica to trade for the cacao beans or whether traders brought them north or whether the beans simple passed from hand to hand from one group of people to another.

Owner of the Kakawa Chocolate House in Santa Fe and local chocolate historian Mark Sciscenti has created a recipe for Mayan Chocolate from the ingredients the Mayans were known to have used.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of New Mexico. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of New Mexico. "Chocolate Drink Used In Rituals In New Mexico 1,000 Years Ago." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090203173331.htm>.
University of New Mexico. (2009, February 5). Chocolate Drink Used In Rituals In New Mexico 1,000 Years Ago. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090203173331.htm
University of New Mexico. "Chocolate Drink Used In Rituals In New Mexico 1,000 Years Ago." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090203173331.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

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