Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Diabetes: Increasing Understanding Of How To Control Islet Cell Growth

Date:
February 27, 2009
Source:
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
Summary:
The molecular mechanism of how a protein determines the fate of the cells that make and release insulin have been identified in new research.

Michael Lan, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, is the senior author of a paper revealing the molecular mechanism of how a protein determines the fate of the cells that make and release insulin.

Dr. Lan's laboratory is studying INSM1, a protein involved in the regulation of hormone- producing, or endocrine, cells. INSM1 plays a critically important role in the development of pancreatic beta cells– the only cells in the body that secrete insulin. Beta cells are located in islet cell clusters throughout the pancreas. Diabetes mellitus type 1 results from the destruction or dysfunction of islets and their beta cells. Type 2 diabetes results from the body's inability to use insulin properly and a gradual decrease in the pancreas's ability to make it.

In this study, the research group used pancreatic cancer cells to investigate the effects of INSM1 on cell cycle function. INSM1 is a transcription factor– a protein that binds to specific sequences of DNA and controls the target gene expression or action. The researchers developed an inducible system to "turn on" INSM1 in pancreatic cancer cells and found that it resulted in a significant reduction in the cells' growth rate. They showed that the mechanism for this growth inhibition was due to an interaction between INSM1 and cyclin D1, an important cell growth promoting protein. Through the interaction between these two proteins, the growth of the tumor cells was impaired. Further, transplantation of these INSM1 on pancreatic tumor cells into mice showed the growth rate of these tumor cells was significantly inhibited compared to the control cells.

"Taken together, we provide evidence to support that INSM1 binds to cyclin D1, a critical factor in cell growth, and interrupts normal cellular proliferation," notes Dr. Lan. "Our study furthers our understanding of how to control islet cell growth in the culture system, which may ultimately benefit diabetes."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health, as of 2007, 23.6 million people, or 7.8% of the US population, have diabetes. This represents 17.9 million people who have been diagnosed and 5.7 million who do not yet know that they are diabetic. Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death listed on US death certificates in 2006. Studies have found that only about 35-40% of decedents with diabetes had it listed anywhere on the death certificate and only 10-15% had it listed as the underlying cause of death.

The research team included Mary Breslin, PhD, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, as well as Tao Zhang, Wei-Dong Liu, and Nicolle A. Saunee from The Research Institute for Children. The Research Institute for Children is a partnership between LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans and Children's Hospital New Orleans.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Zhang et al. Zinc-finger transcription factor INSM1 interrupts cyclin D1 and CDK4 binding, induces cell cycle arrest. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2009; DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M808843200

Cite This Page:

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. "Diabetes: Increasing Understanding Of How To Control Islet Cell Growth." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090217125744.htm>.
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. (2009, February 27). Diabetes: Increasing Understanding Of How To Control Islet Cell Growth. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090217125744.htm
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. "Diabetes: Increasing Understanding Of How To Control Islet Cell Growth." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090217125744.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Health officials say 2,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. due to weather, but it's excessive heat and cold that claim the most lives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins