Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Medication Does Not Appear To Reduce Progression Of Atherosclerosis

Date:
March 17, 2009
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Compared to placebo, the drug pactimibe did not effect certain measures of atherosclerosis for patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol levels), but these patients did have an increased incidence of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke, according to a new study.

Compared to placebo, the drug pactimibe did not effect certain measures of atherosclerosis for patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol levels), but these patients did have an increased incidence of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke, according to a study in the March 18 issue of JAMA.

One proposed method to help prevent cardiovascular disease is to block the action of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), an enzyme involved in cholesterol accumulation. In theory, inhibition of ACAT-1 (an isoform [different form of the same protein] of ACAT) could slow the progression of atherosclerosis (process in which plaque builds up in the inner lining of the arteries) and prevent the development of vulnerable plaque, according to background information in the article. Treatment with ACAT inhibitors, such as the drug pactimibe, have shown promising results for the prevention of atherosclerosis in various animal tests.

Marijn C. Meuwese, M.D., of the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, and colleagues assessed the efficacy and safety of pactimibe in reducing progression of atherosclerosis in 892 patients with a family history of high cholesterol, which is associated with a higher risk for atherosclerosis. The randomized, placebo-controlled study (Carotid Atherosclerosis Progression Trial Investigating Vascular ACAT Inhibition Treatment Effects [CAPTIVATE]) was conducted at 40 clinics in the United States, Canada, Europe, South Africa and Israel between February 2004 and December 2005. Participants received either 100 mg/d of pactimibe (n = 443) or matching placebo (n = 438), in addition to standard lipid-lowering therapy.

Atherosclerosis was assessed by ultrasound measurements of carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT; a measurement of the thickness of the inner wall of a major artery) at the beginning of the study and at 12, 18, and 24 months. Increasing thickness is considered a marker of increasing plaque in the artery. The treatment was discontinued on October 26, 2005, when the parallel ACTIVATE study failed to demonstrate efficacy of pactimibe vs. placebo.

After 6 months of treatment with pactimibe, the average percentage change from baseline of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) significantly increased by 7.3 percent compared with 1.4 percent in the placebo group. This increase in LDL-C was observed throughout the study and disappeared after discontinuation of the study drug.

The annual progression of maximum CIMT showed no difference between groups. However, the annual progression of the average CIMT showed a significant difference between groups as relative average CIMT increase was observed in patients receiving pactimibe (difference, −0.014 mm). Average CIMT progressed significantly in the pactimibe group within 1 year, whereas only minor progression of average CIMT was observed in the placebo group.

Serious adverse events were reported more frequently by patients in the pactimibe group than in the placebo group (10.0 percent vs. 7.7 percent). Cardiovascular events (6.3 percent vs. 3.4 percent) as well as the composite of cardiovascular death, heart attack, and stroke (2.3 percent vs. 0.2 percent) occurred more frequently in patients receiving pactimibe vs. placebo.

"… in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia, pactimibe had no effect on atherosclerosis as assessed by changes in maximum CIMT compared with placebo but was associated with an increase in mean CIMT as well as increased incidence of major cardiovascular events," the authors write.

They add that the findings from this study and findings from other studies lessen "the promise and further development of this class of drugs for cardiovascular prevention."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Meuwese et al. ACAT Inhibition and Progression of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients With Familial Hypercholesterolemia: The CAPTIVATE Randomized Trial. JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association, 2009; 301 (11): 1131 DOI: 10.1001/jama.301.11.1131

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Medication Does Not Appear To Reduce Progression Of Atherosclerosis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090317162836.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2009, March 17). Medication Does Not Appear To Reduce Progression Of Atherosclerosis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090317162836.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Medication Does Not Appear To Reduce Progression Of Atherosclerosis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090317162836.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A research institute in Paris somehow misplaced more than 2,000 vials of the deadly SARS virus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins