Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nutritious New Low-sugar Juice Targeted For Diabetics, Individuals With High Blood Sugar

Date:
April 5, 2009
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists in China are reporting development of a low-calorie, low-sugar vegetable juice custom-designed for millions of individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetic conditions that involve abnormally high blood sugar.

Scientists have created a diabetes-friendly, low-calorie vegetable juice out of pumpkins, pears, carrots and onions.
Credit: Janali Thompson, The American Chemical Society

Scientists in China are reporting development of a low-calorie, low-sugar vegetable juice custom-designed for millions of individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetic conditions that involve abnormally high blood sugar. They reported on the new drink at the 237th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Salt Lake City, Utah on March 26.

Heqin Xing, Ph.D., and Xiuqi Liu of Jilin University in Changchun, China, described a cost-effective method of preparing a special type of vegetable drink using lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) to remove carbohydrates while retaining good taste, vitamins and other nutrients.

"This is an exciting development," Liu said. "The process significantly removes sugar but retains the nutritional content of the juice's raw materials." To develop the juice — made from pumpkin, balsam pear, onion and carrots — Xing and Liu turned to an age-old technique in the art of food production. For thousands of years, people have cultured food — including everyday eats such as yogurt, cheeses and sausage — by using the same LAB.

LAB microbes produce a compound commonly found in sour milk products called lactic acid. Because of LAB's healthy link to food production, this class of bacteria is also referred to as probiotics.

In the study, LAB reduced sugar content of the vegetable juice by transforming carbohydrates into lactic acid by a routine conversion process called fermentation. As this process increases the juice's acidity, it extends its shelf life as it inhibits growth of other bacteria. Compared to other microorganisms, LAB are known for their ability to withstand acidic environments. In addition to the lactic acid's protection against contamination, the acidity from fermentation could enhance flavors in the beverage.

Xing's and Liu's use of Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. plantarum in the vegetable juice increased its acidity by about 10-fold after 12 hours of fermentation. "The viable cell counts of L. plantarum in the fermented mixed vegetable juice still remained at up to 5 billion colony forming units per teaspoon after four weeks of cold storage," Xing said.

Traditional purification methods are more expensive and highly complex compared to the LAB process, Liu said. "This improves the preparation method of the diabetic-friendly vegetable drinks, but it also simplifies the method over existing ones."

And the taste of the low-sugar vegetable juice? Thanks to the addition of sugar, and a diabetic-friendly sugar substitute called xylitol, Xing said that the juice has a good mix of sweet and sour. "It has a good taste with reduced calories due to lower carbohydrates," said Xing. "I believe we can put it on the market possibly in one year after a few more tests."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Nutritious New Low-sugar Juice Targeted For Diabetics, Individuals With High Blood Sugar." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090326134010.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2009, April 5). Nutritious New Low-sugar Juice Targeted For Diabetics, Individuals With High Blood Sugar. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090326134010.htm
American Chemical Society. "Nutritious New Low-sugar Juice Targeted For Diabetics, Individuals With High Blood Sugar." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090326134010.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) The ebola virus outbreak in West Africa is now linked to 121 deaths. Health officials fear the virus will continue to spread in urban areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) A new study out of Canada says cognitive motor performance begins deteriorating around age 24. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Mt. Everest Helped Scientists Research Diabetes

How Mt. Everest Helped Scientists Research Diabetes

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) British researchers were able to use Mount Everest's low altitudes to study insulin resistance. They hope to find ways to treat diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Carpenter's Injury Leads To Hundreds Of 3-D-Printed Hands

Carpenter's Injury Leads To Hundreds Of 3-D-Printed Hands

Newsy (Apr. 14, 2014) Richard van As lost all fingers on his right hand in a woodworking accident. Now, he's used the incident to create a prosthetic to help hundreds. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins