Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

DNA From Old Insects: No Need To Destroy The Specimen

Date:
April 9, 2009
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Ancient DNA can now be retrieved from various insect remains without destruction of the specimens.

Photographs of a) Harpalus latus, CFx7.2 and b) Otiorhynchus sulcatus, CFx7.16 after overnight treatment in the extraction buffer. No visual damage is seen on the specimens.
Credit: Thomsen et al. Non-Destructive Sampling of Ancient Insect DNA. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (4): e5048 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005048

Ancient DNA can now be retrieved from various insect remains without destruction of the specimens.

Related Articles


Together with eight other authors, Philip Francis Thomsen and Eske Willerslev, from the Centre for Ancient Genetics and Environments, Natural History Museum, University of Copenhagen, use a previously published non-destructive DNA extraction method (Gilbert et al. 2007) to retrieve DNA from ancient macrofossils from permafrost sediments and historical museum beetle specimen.

DNA is successfully retrieved from Siberian macrofossils up to 26,000 years old and dried museum beetle specimens up to 188 years old. This reveals that the method has great potential for aDNA research.

Despite the massive diversity of the group, insects are almost neglected in aDNA studies, which have focused mainly on vertebrates, plants and—to a lesser extent—microbes, revealing aDNA research as a powerful tool for testing hypotheses in biology.

A major constraint on the use of historical, and particularly ancient, insect specimens in aDNA research, is the destructive nature of the sampling procedure. Obviously, this is a problem related to many aDNA sources, but is of particular concern with small specimens, such as insects, where even limited sampling may destroy important morphological characters. So far, most ancient genetic studies on insects have suffered from such destructive sampling procedures.

The results obtained with the non-destructive sampling method in this study, suggests that destruction of specimens is no longer necessary to include insects in aDNA studies.

The use of historical museum specimens has important applications in population genetic studies, where historical specimens could reveal former genetic structures, undetectable with modern material only. Ancient insect macrofossils hold potentials in studies on former ecosystems and climates.

Finally the study applies a classic DNA extraction method for sediments, to look for insect DNA in temperate soil from New Zealand around 1,800-3,000 years ago. DNA from a beetle and a moth or butterfly is obtained from the soil, which includes no visible insect remains. Hence, the DNA is extracted directly from the soil. Retrieval of insect DNA from sediments, have applications for reconstruction of ancient biodiversity, unobtainable in any other way.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Thomsen PF, Elias S, Gilbert MTP, Haile J, Munch K, et al. Non-Destructive Sampling of Ancient Insect DNA. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (4): e5048 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005048

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "DNA From Old Insects: No Need To Destroy The Specimen." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090331201522.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2009, April 9). DNA From Old Insects: No Need To Destroy The Specimen. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090331201522.htm
Public Library of Science. "DNA From Old Insects: No Need To Destroy The Specimen." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090331201522.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Fossils & Ruins News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 27, 2014) A British palaeontologist has discovered a new species of dinosaur while studying fossils in a Canadian museum. Pentaceratops aquilonius was related to Triceratops and lived at the end of the Cretaceous Period, around 75 million years ago. Jim Drury has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Reuters - Entertainment Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) The iconic piano from "Casablanca" and the Cowardly Lion suit from "The Wizard of Oz" fetch millions at auction. Sara Hemrajani reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
3D Map of Antarctic Sea Ice to Shed Light on Climate Change

3D Map of Antarctic Sea Ice to Shed Light on Climate Change

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) A multinational group of scientists have released the first ever detailed, high-resolution 3-D maps of Antarctic sea ice. Using an underwater robot equipped with sonar, the researchers mapped the underside of a massive area of sea ice to gauge the impact of climate change. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ruins Thought To Be Port Actually Buried Greek City

Ruins Thought To Be Port Actually Buried Greek City

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) Media is calling it an "underwater Pompeii." Researchers have found ruins off the coast of Delos. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins