Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Multifocal Lung Cancers Appear To Originate From Single Cancer Clone

Date:
April 7, 2009
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
Multiple, anatomically distinct lung cancer tumors may frequently arise from a single cancer cell, according to a retrospective analysis of patient tumor samples.

Multiple, anatomically distinct lung cancer tumors may frequently arise from a single cancer cell, according to a retrospective analysis of patient tumor samples.

Related Articles


Some lung cancer patients have multiple anatomically distinct tumors at the time of diagnosis. Although such multiple tumors usually share a common appearance, it has been unclear whether they arise from a single tumor or are independent primary cancers.

In the current study, Liang Cheng, M.D., of the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, and colleagues examined 70 lung cancer tumors from 23 female and seven male patients to determine whether multiple tumors from an individual patient shared a common genetic pattern. The investigators analyzed the tumors for chromosome loss at six loci previously associated with lung cancer and for mutations in the TP53 gene. They also analyzed the X-chromosome inactivation pattern in tumors from female patients.

Based on these three analyses, the investigators concluded that the multiple tumors in 23 of the 30 patients (77 percent) arose from a single cancer clone.

"Our findings support the current classification of multifocal lung cancers as advanced-stage cancers…rather than separate primary cancers and the use of therapeutic strategies tailored for patients with advanced-staged cancers," the authors write.

"The results of these studies pose both important biological and clinical management questions," according to Adi F. Gazdar, M.B.B.S., and John D. Minna, M.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, who wrote an accompanying editorial. The editorialists review what is known about the biology of multifocal cancers and note that as many as 8 percent of lung cancer patients have multiple anatomically distinct tumors at the time of diagnosis.

An updated lung cancer classification system is expected sometime in 2009 and will distinguish between patients with regional metastatic disease, including those with multiple tumors at diagnosis, and patients with distant metastases. "Clearly, multifocal lung cancers (without distant metastases) constitute a unique set of tumors having heterogeneous origins and better than expected prognosis and should be classified and treated appropriately," the editorialists write.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Wang X et al. Evidence for Common Clonal Origin of Multifocal Lung Cancers. J Natl Cancer Inst, 2009, 101:560-570

Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Multifocal Lung Cancers Appear To Originate From Single Cancer Clone." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407174633.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2009, April 7). Multifocal Lung Cancers Appear To Originate From Single Cancer Clone. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407174633.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Multifocal Lung Cancers Appear To Originate From Single Cancer Clone." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407174633.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) If you&apos;re looking to boost your health this season, there are a few quick and easy steps to prompt you for success. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best tips to give your health a makeover this spring! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins