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Novel Method Predicts Impact Of A Covert Anthrax Release

Date:
April 13, 2009
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
A new statistical method that can estimate the origin and time of an aerosolized release of the pathogen causing anthrax, following detection of the first few cases has been developed. The method predicts where the most critically affected areas will be following the release of this highly pathogenic agent, which may enable preventative treatment of individuals at risk and protection from the disease.

A new statistical method that can estimate the origin and time of an aerosolized release of the pathogen causing anthrax, following detection of the first few cases has been developed by researchers from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling at Imperial College London in collaboration with the Health Protection Agency's Microbial Risk Assessment group.

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The method predicts where the most critically affected areas will be following the release of this highly pathogenic agent, which may enable preventative treatment of individuals at risk and protection from the disease.

Previously published methods can estimate the date and scale of anthrax release but not the source location or geographic extent of human exposure. The new method uses information about the first people infected, including when they started to experience symptoms of infection and where they live and work, combined with recent weather information, such as wind direction.

Dr Judith Legrand, lead author of the study from the MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling, said: "We have devised a new way to forecast the future course of a potential outbreak and the people and geographic areas likely to be worst affected."

Anthrax has the potential to cause a large number of deaths in the event of a covert, open air release. If such a release were to occur, it is critical for public health decision makers to evaluate its extent and the potential impact on the population and then to identify the people most at risk of infection as soon as possible.

Dr Judith Legrand added: "It is critical to treat people as soon as possible after exposure to anthrax. While forecasts based on small numbers of early cases are less reliable than those obtained later in an outbreak, we show that treating individuals based on early estimates is still likely to save lives overall."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Legrand et al. Estimating the Location and Spatial Extent of a Covert Anthrax Release. PLoS Computational Biology, 2009; 5 (1): e1000356 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000356

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Novel Method Predicts Impact Of A Covert Anthrax Release." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090410075112.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2009, April 13). Novel Method Predicts Impact Of A Covert Anthrax Release. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090410075112.htm
Public Library of Science. "Novel Method Predicts Impact Of A Covert Anthrax Release." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090410075112.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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