Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Helping Hand Of Hybrid Surgery Benefits Colorectal Patients

Date:
April 20, 2009
Source:
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College
Summary:
Despite rapid strides in minimally invasive surgical techniques -- most notably, laparoscopy -- traditional open surgery remains the most common surgical option across the United States for people with diseases of the rectum and colon. A newer, third option is a hybrid -- hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery.

Despite rapid strides in minimally invasive surgical techniques — most notably, laparoscopy — traditional open surgery remains the most common surgical option across the United States for people with diseases of the rectum and colon.

A newer, third option is a hybrid — hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS). The approach is safe and effective and compares favorably with standard laparoscopy, according to a team of colorectal surgical specialists at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

"Laparoscopy offers clear benefits to patients compared with open surgery, including a dramatically smaller incision, less pain and shorter recovery time. But bowel surgery can be highly complex, so sometimes a human hand is helpful," says Dr. Toyooki Sonoda, the lead author of the study, a surgeon at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, and assistant professor of clinical surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College.

Patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, diverticulitis or colorectal cancer may be candidates for partial or total removal of the colon or rectum (colectomy or proctocolectomy). Increasingly, and especially at leading medical centers like NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell, these life-saving procedures are performed laparoscopically.

Dr. Sonoda explains that there are two ways to perform laparoscopic bowel surgery:

  • Standard laparoscopic surgery (SLS), using a small "keyhole" incision through which a small camera and specialized instruments are inserted and manipulated inside the body.
  • Hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS), involving a slightly larger incision at the start of the operation — one just large enough to allow for the insertion of the hand, which then works in tandem with laparoscopic instruments in removing and repairing bowel tissue.

Earlier studies have shown that short-term outcomes were similar between the two procedures. Now, Dr. Sonoda and his co-authors are the first to report that the two techniques have similar long-term safety profiles as well. Both are associated with very low rates of wound infection, hernia, adhesions and small-bowel obstruction — the most common post-operative complications of traditional open intestinal surgery.

The researchers had previously taken part in a multi-institutional, randomized, controlled study that demonstrated that the hand-assisted version of the procedure led to time savings in the OR of half an hour for partial removal of the colon and a full hour for total colectomy compared with standard laparoscopy. One reason for this, says Dr. Sonoda, could be that HALS gives surgeons tactile feeling, including the sensation of depth, that helps facilitate various surgical maneuvers.

"We're committed to providing the best possible surgical results for our patients," says Dr. Jeffrey Milsom, the study's senior author. Dr. Milsom is section chief of colon and rectal surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center and the Jerome J. DeCosse, M.D., Professor of Colon & Rectal Surgery, and professor of surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College. "The hand-assisted approach has been a valuable addition to our arsenal of surgical treatments."

Dr. Milsom advises patients with bowel disease to discuss all three options — SLS, HALS and open surgery — with their surgeon to see which one is most appropriate for them.

Additional co-authors include Drs. Sushil Pandey and Sang Lee, and nurse Koiana Trencheva — all of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Long-term Complications of Hand-Assisted Versus Laparoscopic Colectomy. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, January 2009

Cite This Page:

New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College. "Helping Hand Of Hybrid Surgery Benefits Colorectal Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090415120957.htm>.
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College. (2009, April 20). Helping Hand Of Hybrid Surgery Benefits Colorectal Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090415120957.htm
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College. "Helping Hand Of Hybrid Surgery Benefits Colorectal Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090415120957.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 23, 2014) The WHO has warned up to 20,000 people could be infected with Ebola over the next few weeks. As Sonia Legg reports, the implications for the West African countries suffering from the disease are huge. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million Within 4 Months

Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million Within 4 Months

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) Health officials warn that without further intervention, the number of Ebola cases in Liberia and Sierra Leone could reach 1.4 million by January. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Cases to Triple in Weeks Without Drastic Action

WHO: Ebola Cases to Triple in Weeks Without Drastic Action

AFP (Sep. 23, 2014) The number of Ebola infections will triple to 20,000 by November, soaring by thousands every week if efforts to stop the outbreak are not stepped up radically, the WHO warned in a study on Tuesday. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
5 Ways Men Can Prevent Most Heart Attacks

5 Ways Men Can Prevent Most Heart Attacks

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) No surprise here: A recent study says men can reduce their risk of heart attack by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, which includes daily exercise. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins