Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Way To Distinguish Cancerous From Normal Cells

Date:
April 22, 2009
Source:
Clarkson University
Summary:
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown feature that distinguishes cancer from normal cells: the difference in cell surface properties.

A rendering shows the spherical probe of an atomic-force microscope touching human epithelial cervical cancers cells. One can clearly see the "brushy" surface of the cells.
Credit: Image courtesy of Clarkson University

A group of Clarkson University researchers led by Nanoengineering and Biotechnology Laboratories Center (NABLAB) Director Igor Sokolov has discovered a previously unknown feature that distinguishes cancer from normal cells: the difference in cell surface properties.

The authors have identified a critical difference between the surface properties of normal and cancer cells: variation in brushes or tiny “hairs” that cover the cell surface.

The results imply that the brush layer cannot be ignored as was previously done when characterizing cells by mechanical methods. The authors suggest that the difference in the brush layers may have a biological significance, and can be used for detection of cancer.

Brushes on the cell surface, mostly consisting of microridges and tiny hairs called microvilli, are important for interacting with the external environment. Sokolov and his colleagues processed force measurements — taken from the cell surface using an atomic force microscope — according to a model that accounts for these brushes, to quantitatively show that cancerous cells are different. Normal cells have brushes of one length, whereas cancerous cells have mostly two brush lengths of significantly different densities.

The study is done with the help of a physical instrument, the atomic force microscope, which is not a conventional tool for biological research. As a result, the differences found were outside of what is conventionally measured in biology.

"Cancer cells are traditionally detected by biochemical means," says Sokolov. "However, despite many years of success, those methods have not resulted in defeating cancer. Therefore it is very important to search for alternative, nontraditional ways of looking at cancer. Investigation of the physical properties of cell surfaces might be one such nontraditional way."

The authors also demonstrated that the difference found in cell surface "brush" is practically impossible to find with other microscopic methods.

The research group consists of Sokolov, professor of physics and chemical & biomolecular science; Craig D. Woodworth, professor of biology; Swaminathan Iyer, a physics postdoctoral fellow; and Ravi M. Gaikwad and Venkatesh Subba-Rao, both physics graduate students.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Clarkson University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Iyer et al. Atomic force microscopy detects differences in the surface brush of normal and cancerous cells. Nature Nanotechnology, Online April 13, 2009; DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2009.77

Cite This Page:

Clarkson University. "New Way To Distinguish Cancerous From Normal Cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090418080210.htm>.
Clarkson University. (2009, April 22). New Way To Distinguish Cancerous From Normal Cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090418080210.htm
Clarkson University. "New Way To Distinguish Cancerous From Normal Cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090418080210.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Predicting Heart Transplant Rejection With a Blood Test

Predicting Heart Transplant Rejection With a Blood Test

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Now a new approach to rejection of donor organs could change the way doctors predict transplant rejection…without expensive, invasive procedures. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Better Braces That Vibrate

Better Braces That Vibrate

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) The length of time you have to keep your braces on could be cut in half thanks to a new device that speeds up the process. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone App Tracks Your Heart Rate

Smartphone App Tracks Your Heart Rate

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) A new app that can track your heart rate 24/7 is available for download in your app store and its convenience could save your life. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stroke in Young Adults

Stroke in Young Adults

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) A stroke can happen at any time and affect anyone regardless of age. This mother chose to give her son independence and continue to live a normal life after he had a stroke at 18 years old. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins