Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Imaging Analysis Predicts Brain Tumor Survival

Date:
April 23, 2009
Source:
University of Michigan Health System
Summary:
As early as one week after beginning treatment for brain tumors, a new imaging analysis method was able to predict which patients would live longer, researchers have found.

Scans showing gliomas that did not (left) and did (right) respond to treatment. Top images are parametric response maps superimposed onto pre-treatment MRIs. Graphs show distribution of relative cerebral blood volume for entire tumor volume.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Michigan Health System

As early as one week after beginning treatment for brain tumors, a new imaging analysis method was able to predict which patients would live longer, researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found.

The method uses a standard magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, protocol to monitor changes over time in tumor blood volume within individual voxels of the image, rather than a composite view of average change within the tumor. This parametric response map allowed researchers to see specific areas in which tumor blood volume increased or decreased, that may have canceled each other out when looking at the changes as an average.

"What we have potentially is a generalized analytical approach that we can use to quantify treatment intervention in patients," says study author Brian Ross, Ph.D., professor of radiology and biological chemistry at the U-M Medical School and co-director of the Molecular Imaging Program at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The researchers looked at 44 people with high-grade glioma, a type of brain tumor, who were treated with chemotherapy and radiation. Each participant underwent MRIs before treatment, and one week and three weeks after starting treatment. The researchers then looked at the relative cerebral blood volume and the relative cerebral blood flow of the tumor to analyze voxel-wise changes among the serial scans.

Looking at standard comparisons using averages, the scans indicated no change one week and three weeks into treatment. But, using the parametric response map approach, the researchers were able to show changes in the tumor's blood volume and blood flow after one week that corresponded to the patient's overall survival.

"We're seeing treatment response earlier into the treatment, and responses that couldn't be detected at all looking at average changes. We could detect this after just one week, which is amazing for brain tumors," says study author Craig Galbαn, Ph.D., assistant professor of radiology at the U-M Medical School.

High grade gliomas have a high mortality rate, with people surviving only an average of 12 months after diagnosis. Typically, patients receive six to seven weeks of treatment, followed by a traditional MRI scan six weeks after completing therapy to determine if the tumor shrank. If the cancer did not respond to the treatment, a new approach may be tried.

The researchers believe this approach might also be useful with other imaging techniques such as PET and CT scans.

Brain cancer statistics: 21,810 Americans will be diagnosed with brain cancer this year and 13,070 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

Additional authors include Thomas Chenevert, Ph.D.; Charles Meyer, Ph.D.; Christina Tsien, M.D., Theodore Lawrence, M.D., Ph.D.; Daniel Hamstra, M.D., Ph.D.; Larry Junck, M.D.; Pia Sundgren, M.D., Ph.D.; Timothy D. Johnson, Ph.D.; David Ross; and Alnawaz Rehemtulla, Ph.D.

Funding was provided by the National Institutes of Health.

The University of Michigan has filed a patent application on this technology.

Journal reference: Nature Medicine, doi: 10.1038/nm.1919


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Michigan Health System. "New Imaging Analysis Predicts Brain Tumor Survival." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090419133903.htm>.
University of Michigan Health System. (2009, April 23). New Imaging Analysis Predicts Brain Tumor Survival. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090419133903.htm
University of Michigan Health System. "New Imaging Analysis Predicts Brain Tumor Survival." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090419133903.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins