Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Excluding The Lateral View In Chest Radiograph Screenings Decreases Radiation Exposure By 67 Percent

Date:
April 23, 2009
Source:
American Roentgen Ray Society
Summary:
For the patient with a positive PPD test, which usually indicates prior exposure to tuberculosis, the guidelines recommend a chest x-ray that typically includes a frontal and lateral view. The lateral view, which accounts for 2/3 of the total radiation dose during screening, is not necessary, according to a study performed at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Mass.

For the patient with a positive PPD test, which usually indicates prior exposure to tuberculosis, the guidelines recommend a chest x-ray that typically includes a frontal and lateral view. The lateral view, which accounts for 2/3 of the total radiation dose during screening, is not necessary, according to a study performed at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA.

Related Articles


Chest radiographs, including a lateral view, were taken in 857 patients with positive PPD (tuberculosis) screenings. Abnormalities were detected in 91 of them. “In no case did the lateral view show any abnormality that was not shown on the frontal view, nor did it improve visualization,” said Ronald Eisenberg, MD, lead author of the study. “Eliminating the lateral view would reduce a patient’s overall radiation exposure by about 67 percent,” said Dr. Eisenberg.

“The current guidelines recommend that everyone who has a positive tuberculosis test should have a chest radiograph. We evaluated individuals for pre-employment purposes who were asymptomatic and concluded that there is no need to take a lateral view in this situation,” said Dr. Eisenberg. “However, each individual institution will have to decide for itself whether it is appropriate or not,” he said.

“I believe that all radiologists should always try to limit the radiation dose to our patients as much as possible. Eliminating the lateral view of the chest in this specific situation will decrease radiation exposure and will streamline the work flow for technologists,” said Dr. Eisenberg.

This study will be presented at the 2009 ARRS Annual Meeting in Boston, MA, on Tuesday, April 28.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Roentgen Ray Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Roentgen Ray Society. "Excluding The Lateral View In Chest Radiograph Screenings Decreases Radiation Exposure By 67 Percent." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423132700.htm>.
American Roentgen Ray Society. (2009, April 23). Excluding The Lateral View In Chest Radiograph Screenings Decreases Radiation Exposure By 67 Percent. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423132700.htm
American Roentgen Ray Society. "Excluding The Lateral View In Chest Radiograph Screenings Decreases Radiation Exposure By 67 Percent." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423132700.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) Conflicting studies published in the same week re-ignited the debate over whether we should be eating breakfast. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins