Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Where Tumor Cells Boldly Go: Cancer Biologists Shed Light On The Metastatic Niche

Date:
May 7, 2009
Source:
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College
Summary:
A team of cancer researchers is focusing on a new model of the disease: the permissive microenvironment, or the metastatic niche, that forms in particular tissues located far from the primary tumor, well before full metastasis takes hold.

Traditionally, cancer biologists have embraced a simple and direct model of the disease process: The tumor -- the "seed" -- was seen as bearing total responsibility for the spread of cancer to distant tissues -- the "soil" in which the seed embedded itself, grew, and reproduced. The result was a seed-dominant model that determined the way doctors treated cancer, using strategies targeting the tumor seed but neglecting the role of the soil.

Recently, however, some researchers have been focusing on the permissive microenvironment, or the metastatic niche, that forms in particular tissues located far from the primary tumor, well before full metastasis takes hold.

"In cancer, it is metastatic disease that causes morbidity and mortality," says Dr. David Lyden, co-author of an article in the April 2009 issue of Nature Reviews Cancer.

"At our lab, we're developing a strategic approach to studying metastasis. Our goal is ultimately to be able to predict and pre-empt the process -- early, if possible, but even in advanced metastasis," adds Dr. Lyden, the Stavros S. Niarchos Associate Professor in Pediatric Cardiology, an investigator in the Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, and associate professor of cell and development biology at Weill Cornell Medical College.

Led by Dr. Lyden, a team of researchers is looking at the molecular and cellular players that mediate changes at future sites of metastasis such as liver, lung, brain or bone, and thereby direct the migration patterns of tumor cells.

The group has zeroed in on several of these essential players, including bone marrow-derived cells and growth factors secreted by the tumor itself. These, Dr. Lyden explains, instruct the pre-metastatic niche to get ready for a long visit, one that will require comfortable accommodations for a rapidly growing population of permanent guests.

If the pre-metastatic niche does the tumor's bidding and boosts production of inflammatory chemokines and fibronectin, among other cancer-friendly proteins, a secondary tumor has a good chance of forming -- and thriving.

Dr. Lyden believes his lab's discoveries could open doors leading to the development of new cancer treatments that target each step along the metastatic pathway. "We can envision a time in the not-too-distant future when we'll be able to prevent metastasis through a new approach for early detection and treatment," he says. "That's why we're studying the earliest changes in the pre-metastatic niche in such depth.

"At the same time," he continues, "the challenge is to understand metastasis in its entirety by familiarizing ourselves with the shifting molecular and cellular microenvironment at each step along the way. The ramifications of this approach for cancer treatment, we believe, are inestimable."

The Lyden lab at Weill Cornell was one of seven to be represented in the current issue of Nature Reviews, which is devoted exclusively to the subject of cancer metastasis in a special issue. In their article titled "The Metastatic Niche: Adapting the Foreign Soil," Dr. Lyden and lead author Dr. Bethan Psaila, a Fulbright Fellow in the Lyden lab, summarize the discoveries and insights they've gleaned over the past decade.

"The 'seed and soil' hypothesis is considered one of the most important among cancer biologists, but our lab -- especially in collaboration with Dr. Rosandra Kaplan and the lab of Dr. Shahin Rafii -- was actually first to address it in real terms," Dr. Lyden says. "Now, many other labs are moving in this direction, and all of them are opening up highly promising new avenues for inquiry."

Preventing and treating cancerous tumors will continue to be central to cancer treatment strategy, he adds. But soon, we may begin to see new strategies aimed at disarming the real killer: metastatic disease.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College. "Where Tumor Cells Boldly Go: Cancer Biologists Shed Light On The Metastatic Niche." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090501162807.htm>.
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College. (2009, May 7). Where Tumor Cells Boldly Go: Cancer Biologists Shed Light On The Metastatic Niche. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090501162807.htm
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College. "Where Tumor Cells Boldly Go: Cancer Biologists Shed Light On The Metastatic Niche." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090501162807.htm (accessed April 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 22, 2014) Big pharma on the move as Novartis boss, Joe Jimenez, tells Reuters about plans to transform his company via an asset exchange with GSK, and Astra Zeneca shares surge on speculation that Pfizer is looking for a takeover. Joanna Partridge reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

AP (Apr. 22, 2014) Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is given hands-on demonstrations Tuesday of some of the newest research from DARPA _ the military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program. (April 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins