Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Individualized Treatment For Heart Failure Rarely Available Outside Hospital: New Telemonitoring Systems Could 'Radically' Change The Situation

Date:
June 2, 2009
Source:
European Society of Cardiology
Summary:
Telemonitoring systems, by which the symptoms of heart failure can be remotely assessed, now provide a strategy for the improved personalized care of patients, according to researchers.

Telemonitoring systems, by which the symptoms of heart failure can be remotely assessed, now provide a strategy for the improved personalised care of patients, according to Professor John Cleland from the University of Hull, UK. He told Heart Failure Congress 2009 that the management of heart failure is complex but most effective when tailored to the individual patients' needs and condition.

"Unfortunately," he added, "the resources required to offer this tailored treatment outside a hospital setting are generally not available. Current services provide, at best, only a crude attempt to deliver long-term, personalised healthcare, but telemonitoring provides a strategy which could radically change this situation."

Professor Cleland explained that the first generation of home monitoring devices for heart failure were relatively simple. They were designed to measure symptoms, weight, heart rate and rhythm, and blood pressure. But, he said, "from the patient's perspective, they were relatively unrewarding since the systems provide little in the way of advice or feedback. Nonetheless, a series of randomised controlled trials have shown a reduction in mortality and in days spent in hospital, although not in the rate of hospitalisation."

Ongoing trials of second generation equipment, he continued, reflect the same measure of symptom assessment but a more interactive experience for the patient. "These newer systems," he explained, "provide education, feedback to patients on their results, treatment and appointment reminders and a limited amount of advice on adjusting therapy. They are likely to deliver even greater health gains than first generation systems."

And now, further generations of telemonitoring systems are being developed, including:

  • Implanted systems – ranging form a large pacemaker-like device which simply measures cardiac output and filling pressures, to standard pacemakers and defibrillators with additional telemonitoring capability, to devices that can be implanted percutaneously and don't require batteries. These may or may not be linked to external sensors for measuring weight and blood pressure.
  • Ingested systems – as an integral part of the patient's daily therapy
  • New sensors which can measure heart, lung and vascular function and/or fluid retention more accurately.
  • New systems which empower the patient, allowing them to make their own decisions about their care, with a distant supervisory role for a nurse or doctor. By including voluntary services and informal carers, this can increase rather decrease social inclusion.

However, Professor Cleland added that such a rapid technical evolution has run far ahead of any service evolution, and warned that conventional clinical trials are likely to underestimate the benefits of these new telehealth systems once integrated into an efficient service. Future clinical trials, he said, should ensure service integration and define the "control" intervention: "If service integration is poor or insufficient resources are invested in the control group, then even an effective technology will fail."

A meta-analysis of 14 randomised controlled trials (4264 patients) of remote monitoring found that programmes for chronic heart failure which included some form of remote monitoring had a positive effect on clinical outcomes in community-dwelling patients with chronic heart failure.3

The presentation by Cleland JGF is entitled, "Assessment of symptoms in clinics and trials."

Heart Failure Congress 2009 is organised by the European Society of Cardiology and Heart Failure Association of the ESC, and takes place from 30 May to 2 June, 2009 at the Palais Acropolis, Nice, France.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Society of Cardiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Clark et al. Telemonitoring or structured telephone support programmes for patients with chronic heart failure: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ, 2007; 334 (7600): 942 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.39156.536968.55

Cite This Page:

European Society of Cardiology. "Individualized Treatment For Heart Failure Rarely Available Outside Hospital: New Telemonitoring Systems Could 'Radically' Change The Situation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090530094508.htm>.
European Society of Cardiology. (2009, June 2). Individualized Treatment For Heart Failure Rarely Available Outside Hospital: New Telemonitoring Systems Could 'Radically' Change The Situation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090530094508.htm
European Society of Cardiology. "Individualized Treatment For Heart Failure Rarely Available Outside Hospital: New Telemonitoring Systems Could 'Radically' Change The Situation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090530094508.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins