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Fallopian Tubes Offer New Stem Cell Source

Date:
June 18, 2009
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
Human tissues normally discarded after surgical procedures could be a rich additional source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. New research shows for the first time that human fallopian tubes are abundant in mesenchymal stem cells which have the potential of becoming a variety of cell types.

Human tissues normally discarded after surgical procedures could be a rich additional source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. New research shows for the first time that human fallopian tubes are abundant in mesenchymal stem cells which have the potential of becoming a variety of cell types.

It has previously been shown that mesenchymal stem cells obtained from umbilical cords, dental pulp and adipose tissue, which are all biological discards, are able to differentiate into muscle, fat, bone and cartilage cell lineages; therefore, the search for sources to obtain multipotent stem cells from discarded tissues and without ethical problems is of great interest.

Tatiana Jazedje, and the research team from Human Genome Research Centre at the University of São Paulo, directed by Mayana Zatz, with the collaboration of medical doctors from the reproductive area, set out to isolate and assess the differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells from discarded human fallopian tubes. In the study, human fallopian tubes were obtained from hysterectomy and other gynecological procedures from fertile women in their reproductive years (range 35-53 years) who had not undergone hormonal treatment for at least three months prior to surgery.

The Brazilian team found that human fallopian tube mesenchymal stem cells could be easily isolated and expanded in vitro, and are able to differentiate into muscle, fat, cartilage and bone cell lines. The cells' chromosome complement showed no abnormalities, suggesting chromosomal stability. Jazedje comments, "In addition to providing an additional potential source for regenerative medicine, these findings might contribute to reproductive science as a whole."

Jazedje concludes, "Moreover, the use of human tissue fragments that are usually discarded in surgical procedures does not pose ethical problems."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Tatiana Jazedje, Paulo M Perin, Carlos E Czeresnia, Mariangela Maluf, Silvio Halpern, Mariane Secco, Daniela F Bueno, Natassia M Vieira, Eder Zucconi and Mayana Zatz. Human fallopian tube: a new source of multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells discarded in surgical procedures. Journal of Translational Medicine, (in press) [link]

Cite This Page:

BioMed Central. "Fallopian Tubes Offer New Stem Cell Source." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090617201802.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2009, June 18). Fallopian Tubes Offer New Stem Cell Source. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090617201802.htm
BioMed Central. "Fallopian Tubes Offer New Stem Cell Source." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090617201802.htm (accessed August 23, 2014).

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