Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Method For Computing Evolutionary Trees Could Revolutionize Evolutionary Biology

Date:
June 20, 2009
Source:
University of Texas at Austin
Summary:
Detailed, accurate evolutionary trees that reveal the relatedness of living things can now be determined much faster and for thousands of species with a computing method developed by computer scientists and a biologist.

Detailed, accurate evolutionary trees that reveal the relatedness of living things can now be determined much faster and for thousands of species with a computing method developed by computer scientists and a biologist at The University of Texas at Austin.

They report their new method in the journal Science.

Since Charles Darwin, biologists have constructed evolutionary trees to explain the relatedness of plants, animals and other organisms. The science of figuring out these trees, known as systematics, has progressed significantly in the last two decades largely due to advances in computation, genetics and molecular biology.

However, many of the relationships among the world's 1.5 million described species (the true number could be 10 million or more) remain to be figured out, and surprises still remain. Figuring out these relationships requires analyzing large amounts of molecular data, such as DNA and protein sequences.

Computer scientist Tandy Warnow, biologist Randy Linder and their graduate students have created an automated computing method, called SATé, that can analyze these molecular data from thousands of organisms, simultaneously figuring out how the sequences should be organized and computing their evolutionary relatedness in as little as 24 hours.

Previous simultaneous methods like Warnow and Linder's have been limited to analyzing 20 species or fewer and have taken months to complete.

"SATé could completely change the practice of making evolutionary trees and revolutionize our understanding of evolution," says Warnow, professor of computer science and lead author of the study.

In addition, SATé can accurately analyze DNA sequences that are rapidly evolving. These sequences have been previously avoided due to concern that the resulting trees would be poor.

Before a tree, or phylogeny, can be determined, DNA and protein sequence data must be organized. This process is called alignment. Key to Warnow and Linder's program is its ability to quickly and accurately align these data.

"Our process is novel because it rapidly and simultaneously aligns sequences and looks for the best phylogenies," says Linder, associate professor of integrative biology. "The old way of doing this for a large number of sequences was basically to align the data once, but we can look at many arrangements to find better ones."

This is important because different alignments can lead to significantly different phylogenies, and scientists must find the phylogeny that best represents the evolutionary relationships among the species in question.

For their paper, Warnow, Linder and their students tested SATé using computer-generated data and real biological data. The biological data had been previously aligned manually by other experts.

The new phylogenies closely match those existing, both validating the method's potential, and, in some cases, validating the evolutionary trees themselves.

"Instead of doing things by hand, evolutionary biologists can now trust our automated program," says Warnow. "It will enable the creation of much more accurate trees, especially for the Tree of Life, which deals with hundreds of thousands of gene sequences from the millions of species on Earth."

"Warnow and Linder have created a method that speeds up the process and removes any subjectivity," says Michael Braun, an evolutionary biologist at the Smithsonian Institution not associated with this project. "This is a major step forward for evolutionary biology."

Computer science graduate student Kevin Liu is first author on the paper. Students Sindhu Raghavan and Serita Nelesen also contributed to the project and co-authored the paper.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas at Austin. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Texas at Austin. "Method For Computing Evolutionary Trees Could Revolutionize Evolutionary Biology." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090618143952.htm>.
University of Texas at Austin. (2009, June 20). Method For Computing Evolutionary Trees Could Revolutionize Evolutionary Biology. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090618143952.htm
University of Texas at Austin. "Method For Computing Evolutionary Trees Could Revolutionize Evolutionary Biology." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090618143952.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) — The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) — Tourists in Palau clamour to dive with sharks thanks to a pioneering conservation initiative -- as the island nation plans to completely ban commercial fishing in its vast ocean territory. 01:15 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins