Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Slotted Buses Keep Passengers Cool: Improving Bus Design Cools Passengers, Saves Fuel

Date:
July 21, 2009
Source:
Inderscience Publishers
Summary:
A simple redesign of public buses used in hot and dry climates could make passengers more comfortable without the need to use extra fuel running air conditioning, according to a new study,

A simple redesign of public buses used in hot and dry climates could make passengers more comfortable without the need to use extra fuel running air conditioning, according to a study published in the International Journal of Heavy Vehicle Systems.

Sunil Kale of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India, and colleagues point out that the majority of passenger trips are taken in open window buses.

Worldwide, buses are the principal means of commuting within and between cities, the researchers explain. For cost reasons, particularly in the developing world, only a small fraction (less than 5%) of inter-city vehicles are air-conditioned. They add that air-conditioning is not a commercially or environmentally viable alternative to simply opening the side windows and even the doors.

Opened windows are supposed to improve airflow and keep passengers cool while the bus moves. However, the cooling effect of open side windows is inadequate for comfort in the hottest parts of the world on a crowded bus.

Kale's team has now carried out an aerodynamic study of fluid flow in a 1:25 model. Their findings suggest that a few simple modifications to conventional design could significantly boost cooling airflow with none of the cost or energy requirements of an air- conditioning system.

The turbulent flow into a standard bus does not allow air into all areas. Passengers sitting near or standing in the aisle do not receive any ventilation, while those in the front seats receive airflow from the rear. The team has found that a wide vent at the front and rear of a bus will draw air into the bus at a much better rate than side windows. A similar boost can be obtained with adjustable roof vents.

These modifications would allow cooling air to increase the comfort zone of the bus from a mere 11% of the interior volume to more than 50%. This means that all passengers will experience some cooling airflow. In addition to improved comfort there is an overall reduction in drag. Some of this drag reduction could be sacrificed to provide grills and filters to prevent the influx of insects and dust. Optionally a passive evaporative cooling system could be incorporated into the vents to cool the incoming air and further boost the comfort inside the bus.

"In a long-term policy perspective of sustainable transport, buses form an important mode of transport that needs to be strengthened," the researchers say, "Besides improving fuel economy, passenger comfort is a major issue with such buses especially in tropical climates."

"Aerodynamics of a bus with open windows" in International Journal of Heavy Vehicle Systems, 2009, 16, 459-488


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Inderscience Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kale et al. Aerodynamics of a bus with open windows. International Journal of Heavy Vehicle Systems, 2009; 16: 459-488

Cite This Page:

Inderscience Publishers. "Slotted Buses Keep Passengers Cool: Improving Bus Design Cools Passengers, Saves Fuel." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 July 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090720111444.htm>.
Inderscience Publishers. (2009, July 21). Slotted Buses Keep Passengers Cool: Improving Bus Design Cools Passengers, Saves Fuel. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090720111444.htm
Inderscience Publishers. "Slotted Buses Keep Passengers Cool: Improving Bus Design Cools Passengers, Saves Fuel." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090720111444.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Robotic Eyes' Helps Japan's Bipedal Bot Run Faster

'Robotic Eyes' Helps Japan's Bipedal Bot Run Faster

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 16, 2014) Japanese researcher uses an eye-sensor camera to enable a bipedal robot to balance itself, while running on a treadmill. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lockheed Martin's Fusion Concept Basically An Advertisement

Lockheed Martin's Fusion Concept Basically An Advertisement

Newsy (Oct. 15, 2014) Lockheed Martin announced plans to develop the first-ever compact nuclear fusion reactor. But some experts said the excitement is a little premature. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First Confirmed Case Of Google Glass Addiction

First Confirmed Case Of Google Glass Addiction

Buzz60 (Oct. 15, 2014) A Google Glass user was treated for Internet Addiction Disorder caused from overuse of the device. Morgan Manousos (@MorganManousos) has the details on how many hours he spent wearing the glasses, and what his symptoms were. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Science Proves Why Pizza Is So Delicious

Science Proves Why Pizza Is So Delicious

Buzz60 (Oct. 15, 2014) The American Chemical Society’s latest video about chemistry in every day life breaks down pizza, and explains exactly why it's so delicious. Gillian Pensavalle (@GillianWithaG) has the video. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins