Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

How Do You Analyse A Criminal?

Date:
September 11, 2009
Source:
NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research)
Summary:
The use of digital data analysis within law enforcement is not simple. For example, how can you predict if somebody is a terrorist? A Dutch researcher has developed a model that makes digital data analysis more reliable.

The use of digital data analysis within law enforcement is not simple. For example, how can you predict if somebody is a terrorist? Dutch researcher Stijn Vanderlooy has developed a model that makes digital data analysis more reliable.

Related Articles


In recent years there has been a rapid increase in the storage of digital data within the field of law enforcement. However, this data must be analysed to extract knowledge. For example, where does the perpetrator of a crime live? How great is the chance that somebody shall commit several crimes and therefore become a repeat offender? Within law enforcement the reliability of the data is, however, vitally important. And that is where the problem lies: the available computer models are not considered to be reliable enough.

The three highly promising stages for data analysis that Vanderlooy has identified, consist of different steps. First of all the data (for example persons) are no longer divided into classes but are organised according to the likelihood that they belong in a class. This approach opens up a large number of new applications, for example tracing organised credit card fraud or drawing up suspect profiles. Subsequently, if a classification of probability is used then the quality of the computer model can be guaranteed up to a desired level. Finally, an optimal computer model is designed for the reliable classification of data in more than two classes.

Vanderlooy's research falls within the research discipline of Machine learning, an aspect of artificial intelligence that provides effective and efficient models for the analysis of data. This project was part of the NWO programme ToKeN (Access To Knowledge and its enhancement Netherlands), which focuses on fundamental problems in the interaction between a human user and knowledge and information systems.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research). "How Do You Analyse A Criminal?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090902122441.htm>.
NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research). (2009, September 11). How Do You Analyse A Criminal?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090902122441.htm
NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research). "How Do You Analyse A Criminal?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090902122441.htm (accessed April 19, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Computers & Math News

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WikiLeaks Refuses To Let Sony Hack Die, Posts Database

WikiLeaks Refuses To Let Sony Hack Die, Posts Database

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) WikiLeaks&apos; Julian Assange says the hacked emails and documents "belong in the public domain." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Self-Powering Camera

Scientists Create Self-Powering Camera

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Apr. 17, 2015) American scientists build a self-powering camera that captures images without using an external power source, allowing it to operate indefinitely in a well-lit environment. Elly Park reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
The State Of Virtual Reality

The State Of Virtual Reality

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Virtual Reality is still a young industry. What’s on offer and what should we expect from our immersive new future? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cybercrime Could Cost $400 Bln

Cybercrime Could Cost $400 Bln

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 16, 2015) Representatives from around 160 countries gather at the Hague to discuss cyber space and cyber security, including the dilemmas and challenges regarding the evolution of the internet. Ciara Lee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins