Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

SNPs Linked With Prostate Cancer Confirmed In Japanese Men, Too

Date:
September 2, 2009
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
A third of the previously identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, associated with prostate cancer in men of European or African ancestry were also associated with prostate cancer in a Japanese population, according to a new study.

A third of the previously identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, associated with prostate cancer in men of European or African ancestry were also associated with prostate cancer in a Japanese population, according to a new study published online September 2 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Related Articles


Genome-wide association studies have primarily been performed in populations of European ancestry, but little is known if the associations discovered in one population are relevant for other populations.

In this study, Matthew L. Freedman, M.D., of the Department of Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues evaluated 23 SNPs previously reported to be associated with prostate cancer risk and clinical covariates (tumor aggressiveness and age at diagnosis, for example) in almost 1350 Japanese men (311 case subjects and 1035 control subjects).

A total of seven SNPs were associated with increased risk of prostate cancer in this study population, but no associations were found with disease aggressiveness or age at diagnosis. Men with six or more risk alleles had substantially higher risk for prostate cancer than men with two or fewer alleles.

"This study supports previous evidence showing that risk estimates for some variants can differ across populations," the authors write. "Examining variants (and their interactions with other variables) within and between populations will likely provide insight into the dramatically different incidence rates of prostate cancer."

In an accompanying editorial, John P.A. Ioannidis, M.D., of the Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine in Greece, said that these data reinforce the idea that discovered variants are often simply population-specific markers that need far more study to confirm as functional culprits.

However, the editorialist points out, population diversity could have implications about the use of information from these studies for predictive purposes. "…this is just the beginning," the editorialist writes. "The findings need to be replicated again and then again validated."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "SNPs Linked With Prostate Cancer Confirmed In Japanese Men, Too." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090902161114.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2009, September 2). SNPs Linked With Prostate Cancer Confirmed In Japanese Men, Too. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090902161114.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "SNPs Linked With Prostate Cancer Confirmed In Japanese Men, Too." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090902161114.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) Conflicting studies published in the same week re-ignited the debate over whether we should be eating breakfast. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) The family of a Dallas nurse infected with Ebola in the US says doctors can no longer detect the virus in her. Despite the mounting death toll in West Africa, there are survivors there too. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins