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Cutting Sodium Consumption: A Major Public Health Priority

Date:
October 27, 2009
Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Summary:
Reducing sodium intake is a major public health priority that must be acted upon by governments and nongovernmental organizations to improve population health, experts urge in a new article.

Reducing sodium intake is a major public health priority that must be acted upon by governments and nongovernmental organizations to improve population health, states an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Higher blood pressure is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and a diet high in sodium has been linked to high blood pressure, vascular and cardiac damage, stomach cancer, osteoporosis and other diseases. Almost 1 billion adults worldwide have hypertension, and 17-30% of these cases can be attributed to excessive sodium consumption.

In developed countries, almost 80% of sodium intake is from processed food. Regulation of the food industry by government will bring about the most effective change, although immediate voluntary action is desired.

The recommended intake in Canada ranges from 1,000 mg/day sodium for people aged 1-3 years to 1,500 mg/day for those aged 9-50. Average daily sodium intake in Canada is more than double the highest recommended level.

"A population-wide reduction in sodium intake could prevent a large proportion of cardiovascular events in both normotensive and hypertensive populations," write Dr. Kevin Willis, Canadian Stroke Network and coauthors. "For example, a population-wide decrease of 2 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure would be estimated to lower the prevalence of hypertension by 17%, coronary artery disease by 6% and the risk of stroke by 15%, with many of the benefits occurring among patients with normal blood pressure."

National public health policy should be focused on reformulating processed food, educating consumers, labelling food clearly and setting timelines to meet these targets. Nongovernmental groups should lobby the food industry to change practice and partner with governments to mount public education campaigns.

As well, health care professionals should to counsel patients about healthy choices in reducing sodium consumption. Training to do this should be incorporated into curricula.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Medical Association Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sailesh Mohan, Norm R.C. Campbell, Kevin Willis. Effective population-wide public health interventions to promote sodium reduction. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2009; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.090361

Cite This Page:

Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Cutting Sodium Consumption: A Major Public Health Priority." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 October 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090914131902.htm>.
Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2009, October 27). Cutting Sodium Consumption: A Major Public Health Priority. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090914131902.htm
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Cutting Sodium Consumption: A Major Public Health Priority." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090914131902.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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