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Keeping hepatitis C virus at bay after a liver transplant

Date:
January 1, 2010
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
Individuals infected with hepatitis C virus who receive a liver transplant find that their new liver becomes infected with HCV almost immediately. However, researcher in Japan have developed an approach that transiently keeps HCV levels down in most treated HCV-infected patients receiving a new liver.

One of the most common reasons for needing a liver transplant is liver failure or liver cancer caused by liver cell infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, in nearly all patients the new liver becomes infected with HCV almost immediately.

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But now, Hideki Ohdan, Kazuaki Chayama, and colleagues, at Hiroshima University, Japan, have developed an approach that transiently keeps HCV levels down in most treated HCV-infected patients receiving a new liver. The researchers report their findings in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Specifically, the team took immune cells known as lymphocytes from the donor livers before they were transplanted into the HCV-infected patients, activated them in vitro, and then injected them into the patients three days after they had received their liver transplants.

Importantly, these infused cells were able to keep the HCV at bay even though the patients were taking immunosuppressive drugs to prevent their immune systems from rejecting the new livers. Despite showing clear clinical effects, the authors are planning further studies in which they will modify the protocol in an attempt to find a way to keep HCV levels down for longer and in all patients.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Masahiro Ohira, Kohei Ishiyama, Yuka Tanaka, Marlen Doskali, Yuka Igarashi, Hirotaka Tashiro, Nobuhiko Hiraga, Michio Imamura, Naoya Sakamoto, Toshimasa Asahara, Kazuaki Chayama, Hideki Ohdan. Adoptive immunotherapy with liver allograft%u2013derived lymphocytes induces anti-HCV activity after liver transplantation in humans and humanized mice. J. Clin. Invest., 2009; DOI: 10.1172/JCI38374

Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Keeping hepatitis C virus at bay after a liver transplant." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091001181043.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2010, January 1). Keeping hepatitis C virus at bay after a liver transplant. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091001181043.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Keeping hepatitis C virus at bay after a liver transplant." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091001181043.htm (accessed November 21, 2014).

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