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New weapon in battle of the bulge: Food releases anti-hunger aromas during chewing

Date:
December 17, 2009
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
A real possibility does exist for developing a new generation of foods that make people feel full by releasing anti-hunger aromas during chewing, scientists in the Netherlands are reporting after a review of research on that topic. Such foods would fight the global epidemic of obesity with aromas that quench hunger and prevent people from overeating.

A real possibility does exist for developing a new generation of foods that make people feel full by releasing anti-hunger aromas during chewing.
Credit: iStockphoto/Jan Couver

A real possibility does exist for developing a new generation of foods that make people feel full by releasing anti-hunger aromas during chewing, scientists in the Netherlands are reporting after a review of research on that topic. Such foods would fight the global epidemic of obesity with aromas that quench hunger and prevent people from overeating. Their article appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Rianne Ruijschop and colleagues note that scientists long have tried to develop tasty foods that trigger or boost the feeling of fullness. Until recently, that research focused on food's effects in stomach after people swallow it. Efforts now have expanded to include foods that release hunger-quenching aromas during chewing. Molecules that make up a food's aroma apparently do so by activating areas of the brain that signal fullness.

Their analysis found that aroma release during chewing does contribute to the feeling of fullness and possibly to consumers' decisions to stop eating. The report cites several possible applications, including developing foods that release more aroma during chewing or developing aromas that have a more powerful effect in triggering feelings of fullness.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ruijschop et al. Retronasal Aroma Release and Satiation: a Review. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2009; 57 (21): 9888 DOI: 10.1021/jf901445z

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "New weapon in battle of the bulge: Food releases anti-hunger aromas during chewing." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091216121502.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2009, December 17). New weapon in battle of the bulge: Food releases anti-hunger aromas during chewing. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091216121502.htm
American Chemical Society. "New weapon in battle of the bulge: Food releases anti-hunger aromas during chewing." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091216121502.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

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