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Dampening CD4+ immune cell function via the protein TLR4

Date:
January 4, 2010
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
The immune system uses a large number of proteins to sense the presence of microbes, including a family of proteins known as TLRs. The function of TLRs on immune cells known as DCs and macrophages has been well characterized, but the role of TLR4 on immune cells known as CD4+ T cells has not been determined.
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The immune system uses a large number of proteins to sense the presence of microbes, including a family of proteins known as TLRs. The function of TLRs on immune cells known as DCs and macrophages has been well characterized, but the role of TLR4 on immune cells known as CD4+ T cells has not been determined.

However, José M. González-Navajas, Eyal Raz and colleagues, at the University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, have now determined that triggering TLR4 on CD4+ T cells dampens their inflammatory function, as TLR4 deficiency in two mouse models of colitis (inflammation of the intestines) accelerated the development of disease and/or induced more severe disease.

Further analysis identified a molecular signaling pathway underlying the inhibitory effects of TLR4 triggering on CD4+ T cell inflammatory function, providing insight into the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses.

The research appears in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. José M. González-Navajas, Sean Fine, Jason Law, Sandip K. Datta, Kim P. Nguyen, Mandy Yu, Maripat Corr, Kyoko Katakura, Lars Eckman, Jongdae Lee and Eyal Raz. TLR4 signaling in effector CD4 T cells regulates TCR activation and experimental colitis in mice. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2010; DOI: 10.1172/JCI40055

Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Dampening CD4+ immune cell function via the protein TLR4." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100104210625.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2010, January 4). Dampening CD4+ immune cell function via the protein TLR4. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100104210625.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Dampening CD4+ immune cell function via the protein TLR4." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100104210625.htm (accessed July 31, 2015).

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